Leeds Councillor claims Grime music is associated with trouble as Norman bar brawl is investigated

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A Leeds Councillor has claimed that grime music is associated with trouble at a licensing hearing for a violence-hit bar.

Norman Bar in Call Lane was forced to close temporarily by Leeds City Council following a mass brawl in the bar on March 24 which saw revellers sprayed with fire extinguishers as bouncers tried to take control of the venue.

Coun Al Garthwaite made the comments at a licensing hearing for Norman bar on Call Lane

Coun Al Garthwaite made the comments at a licensing hearing for Norman bar on Call Lane

The bar has been allowed to remain open, on the condition that ID scanners are used and more bouncers are hired for the venue.

Chairing the meeting, Councillor Al Garthwaite said that the type of music being played contributed to the violent incident and that Grime music is associated with trouble.

She said: “I understand that the type of music being played has contributed to trouble, certainly in the past.

“There was a time when the music was changed, but it was found that the customers ceased to come in such numbers.

“I assume this is grime, I know that grime is associated with trouble.”

Grime music is a popular genre of music which developed from rap and electronic dance music made famous by artists like Stormzy and Lethal Bizzle.

Read more: Recap of the licensing meeting

Norman bar's representative Paddy Whur told the meeting that the venue's management checks DJ's playlists for problematic songs.

He said: “At times Norman bar has a different type of music to the rest of Call Lane and it may contribute to how people behave.

“We are careful with the DJs that we book. And the DJ has to show their full playlist to make sure we don’t offer the type of music that has been an Achilles heel in the past.”

Police are still investigating the mass brawl which took place in March and said more arrests are expected.

Watch the moment fire extinguishers were set off in Norman bar brawl
Conditions for the bar allowed to reopen included requiring polycarbonate plastic glasses to be used instead of glass, a minimum requirement for four door staff at any one time – and that they should each wear body cameras.

ID scanners will also be used to check everyone entering the premises.