PMQs sketch: Brexit seems to be the hardest word

Theresa May speaks during Prime Minister's Questions. Credit: House of Commons/PA
Theresa May speaks during Prime Minister's Questions. Credit: House of Commons/PA
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The most interesting aspect of Prime Minister’s Questions this week was not what was said, but what was left unsaid.

With potentially game-changing Brexit talks scheduled for the afternoon, Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn were keen to keep their powder dry as they engaged in their weekly Commons clash.

The Labour leader began the session, saying: "I welcome the Prime Minister’s offer for talks following meetings I’ve held with members across this House and look forward to meeting her later today and I welcome her willingness to compromise to solve the Brexit deadlock.”

He then moved on to his tried and tested refrains on poverty, housing and welfare delivering rehearsed soundbites designed to be shared on social media.

Mrs May was equally lacklustre, trotting out the same responses on Labour’s supposed fiscal incompetence.

So, with the pair clearly preoccupied with what was to come afterwards, all eyes turned to North Yorkshire MP Nigel Adams who appeared poised to skewer the Prime Minister following his resignation just hours earlier.

But when he was eventually called by the Speaker he asked Mrs May - not why she had got into bed with the opposition leader she claimed to loathe - but instead he raised step-free access at Selby railway station.

So, with the UK set to leave the EU without a deal just over a week away, the Prime Minister got through another Commons spell with next to no scrutiny.

For MPs, it was Brexit that seemed to be the hardest word.