Tributes paid to 'remarkable' Hull fishmonger Billy Glenton

Much missed: Bill Glenton
Much missed: Bill Glenton
0
Have your say

Tributes have been pouring in for much-loved "Hessle Road legend" fishmonger Billy Glenton, who has died after a short illness.

Mr Glenton, who died in hospital on Sunday morning, was in the fish trade for more than five decades.

Customers from all over Yorkshire would beat a path to his shop in the heart of Hull's former fishing community for the "amazing seafood and banter."

Modest from the outside - like the man himself - the shop was always heaving.

There was always laughter, chat and a host of characters - the biggest of which was Mr Glenton, in his trademark cap and apron.

A portrait of Mr Glenton, 72, by Magnum photographer Martin Parr, features prominently in an exhibition at Humber Street Gallery, delving into the city's rich culinary landscape.

His daughter Lisa said she had been overwhelmed by the outpouring of tributes.

She said: "He'd have been amazed because he just did not think literally how he touched people's lives.

"In the last few years he found it hard-going but he still carried on. For him to work as he did and he was in a lot of pain was incredible.

"He lived for the shop, he lived for the business, and aside from the last couple of years he loved it.

"It's only in the last 15 or 20 years when I understood and realised what my Dad meant to the community in Hessle Road."

Mr Glenton, a massive Hull FC supporter, was a barrow lad on the docks from the age of 15. His parents Dolly and Bill opened the shop in 1964.

He had a fishhouse - "like an Aladdin's cave" - in the backway, out of which appeared a huge array of the freshest fish available in the city.

Mr Glenton's generosity was remarkable. Ms Glenton said: "We always used to go mad at him. Say it was £4 for haddock, he'd say: 'just charge £3', and 'here's an extra one.'

"We used to say: 'You're not charging the right price.'"

A customer said: "You weren't a customer to Bill - he treated you as a valued friend.

"I don't you think you will ever find another shop where you go in for fish, and come out with a gift of a rabbit, or whatever he had tucked away behind the counter.

"Going into his shop was like going to the theatre - there was always something happening. Bill knew everyone on Hessle Road."

Another from York wrote: "So sad to hear about Billy's passing. I used to ring him on the morning when coming through to Hull to give him my order. My wife and l couldn't wait to arrive and enjoy the experience of being in Billy's shop.

"Amazing seafood, amazing banter and laughter a joy to be with, you will be sadly missed, it was a pleasure to have known you."

The funeral arrangements have yet to be made.