Bishop of Leeds: Lord’s Prayer cinema ban is due to “illiteracy of a liberal culture”

Bishop of Leeds Nick Baines
Bishop of Leeds Nick Baines
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SO, the major cinema chains have banned a one-minute advert from being shown in their theatres on the grounds that people may be offended. God, give me strength (which is a prayer).

If you don’t pray, then you are almost certainly in a small minority of people on the planet. Even people who claim no faith seem to admit to praying in certain circumstances.

In the last couple of weeks we have seen hashtags and posters, banners and even football scarves, emblazoned with ‘pray4paris’.

Why?

As I said on last Friday’s Thought for the Day on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, programme: “It is interesting that in times of tragedy or challenge, the most unlikely people resort effortlessly to the language of prayer. ‘My thoughts and prayers are with the victims’, we’ve heard; and we’ve seen people kneeling, praying before makeshift shrines and at packed services in the Notre Dame cathedral. But, prayer to whom?”

The fact is: people pray. Billions of people across the globe pray the Lord’s Prayer every day. For some Christians in some parts of the Middle East and Africa, the utterance of this prayer can amount to a death sentence.

Yet, it is a prayer I have seen uttered by those committed to other faiths, but who see in this prayer - taught to his friends by Jesus - a fundamental recognition of human being, human need, and the realities of human experience.

We are not God, but we live in relation to God; we have daily physical needs and we get tempted to go the wrong way; if we don’t forgive those who wrong us, then how on earth do we expect to be forgiven and reconciled by God and others?

In the Christian tradition, prayer is not about presenting shopping lists of requests to a god whose job it is to make life comfortable, convenient or secure for us.

Rather, prayer is that exercise that, bringing us into the presence of God, gradually exposes us to the mind of God towards ourselves and the world where we are. Inevitably, this then exposes us to the need to change so that we gradually see God, the world and ourselves through God’s eyes.

Prayer is open for anyone. Prayer invites us to be open and honest with God and one another - to tell the truth about our fears and anxieties as well as about the things that make us scream with joy. It’s like being stripped back so that we see as we are seen.

So, why do the cinema people think prayer is so dangerous? And who exactly is going to be offended by a one-minute advert that consists of a pile of people saying a phrase of the Lord’s Prayer in sequence?

No propaganda. No coercion. No pressure. Just an encouraging invitation.

What is the problem?

Well, the problem is basically the illiteracy of a liberal culture that thinks itself to be intellectually mature and culturally sound. This culture assumes (I choose the word carefully) that secular humanism is neutral - and self-evidently ‘true’ - and that, by definition, any religious world view is somewhere up the scale of irrational and loaded madness. A five-year-old child could demolish that one. There is no neutral space.

Secondly, as an irrational reflex, religion gets widely connected inextricably with ‘problem’, ‘trouble’ or ‘conflict’. Therefore, it has to be neutralised. The five-year-old would be on a roll by now. Just this morning a Muslim tweeted that, rather than ignoring Remembrance Day and the Poppy Appeal, his group had actually raised more than £400,000 for the Royal British Legion this month. Has anyone actually asked who might be offended by this and why? This phenomenon has echoes in seasonal appeals to empty Christmas of its name.

Thirdly, this religious illiteracy goes deep. Last week the Daily Telegraph reported on the debates that nearly saw the word ‘Abbey’ removed from ‘Downton’. It seems that there was no reference to church (although, for good or ill, church would have been an integral part of the life of those characters), and we never got to see them sit down for a meal because that would have meant seeing them say grace. Really.

There is still time for the people who run the cinema chains to change their mind. They might even invite a conversation about reality ‘out there’ in the world. But, even if they don’t, they have exposed yet again the intellectual and cultural redundancy of a dominant knee-jerk assumption about religion and the world. It would be funny if it weren’t so common.

The Right Reverend Nicholas Baines is the Bishop of Leeds.