Beveridge legacy is being betrayed by social care neglect of vulnerable adults – The Yorkshire Post says

Vulnerable adults are paying the price for Government inaction over social care.
Vulnerable adults are paying the price for Government inaction over social care.
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THE Yorkshire Post continues to make no apology for highlighting the issue of social care – and how 1.5 million vulnerable adults are receiving insufficient support because of the failure of successive governments to put in place long-term funding reforms.

We’re not a civilised society when elderly denied access to the toilet because of social care inaction – Mike Padgham

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock.

Yet, while many people assume that ‘social care’ refers to the health needs of the elderly, they overlook the still significant number of working-age adults who need help because of the seriousness of their physical or learning disabilities.

How new technology can transform social care treatment and staff workload - Professor Martin Green

And the fact that a third of care providers have been forced to cut support in the past year – they say extra money set aside by Ministers has simply not reached the front line – is yet another wake-up call to all political parties about the cost of their inaction.

Why social care scandal demands a fresh start by Tories and Labour – Tom Richmond

William beveridge was the pioneer of social care - but are his values now being betrayed.

William beveridge was the pioneer of social care - but are his values now being betrayed.

As the much-respected charity HfT makes clear, it is the most vulnerable members of society – the very people who the social care system was devised to help when first proposed by William Beveridge nearly 80 years ago – who are paying the heaviest price of all.

Social care providers in Yorkshire are having to make cuts due to financial pressures

Individuals who can, sadly, find themselves without a voice because of the nature of their condition, they’re totally dependent on the ability of charities – and others – to speak up on their behalf.

And while Matt Hancock, the unimpressive and uninspiring Health and Social Secretary, continues to turn a deaf ear to these pleas – he wouldn’t even answer for his own delay and dither at one point in the Commons last week – this newspaper, for one, will continue to highlight his dereliction of duty until the Government sees sense and starts to work with Opposition parties to build a long-term social care plan.