Nurturing the next generation of farmers and learning from Sir Alastair Cook - The Yorkshire Post says

What more can be done to encourage young people into farming?
What more can be done to encourage young people into farming?
0
Have your say

ATTRACTING NEW customers. Learning resourcefulness and resilience. Recognising the value of clear communication – and the importance of succession planning.

All objectives for the country’s political parties as an election looms, they are, in fact, the life lessons being set out by the National Federation of Young Farmers’ Clubs in a new training programme.

A new initiative has been launched to nurture the next generation of farmers.

A new initiative has been launched to nurture the next generation of farmers.

New approach to get young farmers to broach tricky succession talks with parents
Entitled Ready and Resilient, the intention is to help young people learn the life skills that will leave them better-placed to run family farms in the future – and withstand the many challenges, Brexit aside, which will continue to confront the agricultural industry in years to come.

How no-deal Brexit will devastate farming in UK – NFU president Minette Batters

It is hard work, as many farmers will attest. But it can also be incredibly rewarding as Sir Alastair Cook, the former England cricket captain, attests in his just-published autobiography in which he describes his first-hand experiences of lambing and how farm work gives him both “a different element of identity” and “sense of peace” that helped invigorate him before so many of his great innings.

And while Brexit remains the great political imponderable, even more so after this week’s Parliamentary turmoil, agriculture will be as important as ever, even more so with an increased emphasis on locally-sourced food.

Sir Alastair Cook has spoken about his love of farming. Photo: Adam Davy/PA Wire.

Sir Alastair Cook has spoken about his love of farming. Photo: Adam Davy/PA Wire.

Farm leader calls for ‘absolutely critical’ pledges from Chancellor Sajid Javid

As such, it is even more important that there are programmes in place to encourage young people to pursue a career in farming – or an allied industry. Without them, the countryside will not only be a poorer place but the country will be more dependent on food imports – the precise opposite of current political intentions.