Social care silence from Tories after Matt Hancock’s failure to act – The Yorkshire Post says

Boris Johnson and Matt Hancock, the Health and Social Care Secretary, during their visit to Bassetlaw Hospital.
Boris Johnson and Matt Hancock, the Health and Social Care Secretary, during their visit to Bassetlaw Hospital.
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TORY PARTY coyness over its election manifesto can be explained, in part, by the political and electoral backlash that it received in 2017 when Theresa May’s plans included a hastily ditched ‘dementia tax’.

Ahead in the opinion polls, and, potentially, in a position to secure an overall Commons majority on December 12, Boris Johnson and his inner circle clearly want to avoid taking unnecessary risks.

The Tories are providing dfew specifics about social care.

The Tories are providing dfew specifics about social care.

Our social care crisis deserves as much attention as Brexit and here’s why: Mike Padgham

However a tenative promise to seek a “cross-party consensus” need to be placed in context of the Government’s failure to advance this issue in recent years – despite Mr Johnson naming it as one of his top priorities when he succeeded Mrs May as Prime Minister in July.

An open letter to Boris Johnson on social care and on behalf of all dementia victims – Mike Padgham

Despite Jeremy Hunt and Matt Hancock, the past and present Health Secretaries, repeatedly promising to publish a Green Paper stating the options open to Parliament, this long-awaited and long-overdue strategy document has still not been forthcoming.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock (left) joins Boris Johnson on a visit to Bassetlaw Hospital last Friday.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock (left) joins Boris Johnson on a visit to Bassetlaw Hospital last Friday.

Now there’s no mention of the Green Paper as Mr Hancock blames, first, the last Labour government and then the 2017 Tory manifesto, which he supported, for the absence of any progress. In post since January 2018, he’s not stated whether he has attempted to open talks with his opponents.

Yet, in an election where the main parties are making elaborate and eye-catching spending commitments when it comes to the NHS, they need to realise that social and community care needs to be fit for purpose – or NHS hospitals will, irrespective of the extra money becoming available to them, struggle to meet the health needs of an ageing society. Over to you, Mr Hancock.