Support after Yorkshire flooding has been ultimate display of resilience and community spirit - The Yorkshire Post says

A collapsed bridge following heavy rainfall on Grinton moors, North Yorkshire.  Photo: SWNS
A collapsed bridge following heavy rainfall on Grinton moors, North Yorkshire. Photo: SWNS

The community spirit demonstrated during the catastrophic flooding in this region embodies all that is great about Yorkshire.

From a fundraising campaign for a woman whose home in Leyburn was destroyed, to young farmers planning a clean-up day for affected members of the agricultural community and North Yorkshire Police paying to recover vehicles removed from flooded areas, support for those hit has been an ultimate display of resilience and togetherness in the face of adversity.

Flood water outside Dales Cafe and Cakery. Photo: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

Flood water outside Dales Cafe and Cakery. Photo: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

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It is typical of folk of this county to react with such kindness and generosity, refusing to let our own suffer alone - and it is ironic, yet somewhat befitting, that much of this show of support took place on Yorkshire Day, a date set aside for celebrating all that is special about Yorkshire, including its character and its people. Once again, our region has done itself proud.

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However, whilst the efforts of all those who have helped one another during the deluges are certainly humbling, it is crucial that they also have the backing of ministers through the provision of flood defences, and, as the CLA is calling for, support for farmers to restore their livelihoods.

A car being driven through flood water. Photo: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

A car being driven through flood water. Photo: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

In the Government’s budget last October, £13m was pledged for tackling risks from flooding and climate change. But that must only be the beginning.

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An increased chance of wetter winters, hotter summers and extreme weather is projected for the UK this century, and only this week The Met Office said figures showing the ten warmest years have all occurred since 2002, were further indication of a changing climate. Given the likelihood then of more unpredictable downpours of a ferocious intensity, policymakers need to be ahead of the storm. More sophisticated planning and strategising and much greater investment in flood defences is necessary - this week has been a sad reminder of the devastation unbridled weather can bring.