Car-free streets are way forward for environment – Yorkshire Post Letters

From: Andy Dennis, Belmont Terrace, Harrogate.

How can street be made safer for pedestrians?

DURING the pandemic, people have rediscovered the simple act of walking – the oldest, cheapest and greenest transport there is. It has allowed us to stay healthy, happy and connected to those around us.

But lots of us still struggle with narrow, cluttered, uneven pavements; crossings that prioritise cars rather than people; and growing numbers of speeding vehicles.

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That’s why I support Living Streets’ Manifesto for Walking, which calls for candidates in our upcoming election to pledge to end pedestrian deaths and injuries on roads, tackle air pollution, make school streets safe and make walking easier by cutting the clutter on our pavements.

The centre of York - are traffic-free streets the way forward for the environment?

It is time we redesigned our streets around people not cars. That way we can all continue to enjoy the benefits of walking and healthier, happier communities.

From: David Stephenson, Ilkeston.

UNFORTUNATELY I no longer live in Yorkshire but I do read and always enjoy your email news, for which many thanks.

I have just read about the introduction of electric buses into Harrogate. I live now in Ilkeston which is close to Nottingham where they have an electric bus route service between two major hospitals.

I have reached an age and health condition at which I use that service quite a lot. There is a very good car park close to the ring road where the bus stops every 10 minutes or so. It is a very good service.

From: Peter Rickaby, West Park, Selby.

THE future of the Yorkshire Dales is dependent to a large extent on financial support derived from a continuous flow of tourists.

The Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, a climate change devotee, in one breath discourages the use of the car, then in the next refuses to increase grants for DalesBus.

How do they expect people to explore this beautiful area? By pony and trap?

From: Michael Farman, Willow Grove, Beverley.

HAVING announced that it is following hundreds of other councils across the UK and declaring a climate emergency, is East Riding of Yorkshire Council finally beginning to understand what the word “emergency” means?

Until now, Rathlin Energy’s plans to expand their West Newton A oil and gas drilling site in Holderness to triple its area and drill up to six more wells have been waved through by the council without so much as an environmental impact assessment. Now a small group of councillors are questioning this decision (or lack of it). It is to be hoped that they will prevail, and that the council will wake up to the fact that climate action means now, and not some vague time within the next 30 years.

The heyday of fossil fuels was in the last century, not this one.

From: Martin Smith, Ilkley.

THE lack of public comment from Bradford on the increased pollution in the area due to the increased flights from Leeds Bradford Airport needs to be noted. All the comments in the press relate to Leeds.

Leeds approves and Bradford acquiesces. It is clear the environmental aspects were not given sufficient weight during the decision process.

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