Foreign languages should still be embraced in ‘Brexit England’ - Yorkshire Post Letters

The Union flag is taken down outside the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium.
The Union flag is taken down outside the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium.
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From: James Bovington, Church Grove, Horsforth, Leeds.

FORMER MP Michael Meadowcroft is right to emphasise the value of cultural events such as concerts with our twin cities as uplifting symbols of unity in the new post-Brexit dystopia (The Yorkshire Post, February 8).

What will be the impact of Brexit on cultural relations with EU countries?

What will be the impact of Brexit on cultural relations with EU countries?

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However our students are largely to be deprived of the benefits of freedom of movement.

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For nearly 30 years, a main motivating reason language teachers have given for learning foreign languages, such as French and Spanish, is that we all have the right to freedom of movement throughout Europe and this is a practical application of the foreign languages studied in school.

This is no longer true. Can someone explain what motivating factor can replace freedom of movement now that the Conservatives are bringing this to an end?

Just what is the point of learning foreign languages in Brexit England as the new ‘English Worker first’ Conservatives build walls – and create divisions – between educated young English people and their contemporaries elsewhere in Europe?

Or am I just being an educated elitist? If so, perhaps we should save money turn students out to work at 14 and close our universities?