The Yorkshire Post says: Teachers need better support as record numbers abandon profession

Record numbers of teachers are leaving the profession, with many citing high workloads and stress.
Record numbers of teachers are leaving the profession, with many citing high workloads and stress.
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The end of the summer holidays may be greeted with some relief by many parents but for an alarming number of teachers, the start of a new school year will be approached with dread.

New research for BBC Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire has found teachers are leaving the classroom at the highest rate since records began, with a counselling service reporting 75 per cent who responded to a workplace survey say they have faced physical or mental health issues. Other statistics are deeply concerning; one in three teachers quit the classroom within five years of qualifying and 36,000 working-age teachers left the profession last year.

One young teacher from Wakefield said external pressures from frequent curriculum changes, OFSTED inspections and worries about school funding, contributed to his nervous breakdown.

A small area of encouragement is that the Government has acknowledged there is a problem and intends to take action to tackle it. Schools minister Nick Gibb has highlighted initiatives with marking and data collection that are intended to reduce the workload on teachers and allow them to concentrate on their core duties in the classroom.

It is a step in the right direction, albeit it is clear that much more needs to be done in relation to workload and resourcing.

Teachers have a vital, if often under-appreciated role to play in our society, and require the right support and tools to be able to do their jobs effectively. Otherwise, the education of our children will suffer and eventually the nation as a whole will lose out in the long-term.