YP Letters: Care failures and closed wards drive the pressure on A&E

What is the remedy for the NHS?
What is the remedy for the NHS?
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From: Paul Muller FRCS, Sandal, Wakefield.

A&E departments are for accidents and emergency and nothing else (it is in the name).

The triage system must be run by the most senior consultant, and then the patient sent to the appropriate ward after an initial diagnosis has been made so that they can be treated by the medical or surgical consultant, and their team, in a timely fashion.

A&E departments must become a transit department again where patients are rapidly seen and diagnosed, and then transferred for treatment in the appropriate ward.

A&E is not meant to be a treatment centre in hospitals.

In order for this system to work again, all the closed wards in hospitals must be reopened again. Consultants must again have designated beds for routine and emergency admissions.

Care homes are closing because the councils do not have enough money to pay carers a proper salary.

We must adopt a separate tax for our care in old age when we become infirm.

Carers in the community must have proper training and a qualification because they do a very important job.

From: Canon Michael Storey, Healey Wood Road, Brighouse.

THE National Health Service makes news nearly every day; issues of people having to sleep in a toilet, on a corridor, being in hospital for umpteen weeks. It is really time that the Government got its act together.

The “National” element would be helped if the various countries which make up the UK had standard practices. One does begin to question the merit of some elements of devolution.

The Act of Union 1707 was clearly not celebrated in 2007, in case the Scots got upset!

The Government is now proposing to more or less close Huddersfield Royal Infirmary and transfer work to Calderdale Royal Hospital where the car parking is totally inadequate now. Come on Jeremy Hunt, get your act together.

From: H Marjorie Gill, Clarence Drive, Menston.

I BELIEVE that doctors are so bothered about patients being contaminated by items being re-used that a lot of common sense has been thrown out of the window. It was Mrs Thatcher who said that all the goods that were pilfered from all the hospitals in the NHS cost enough money to build and staff at least one new hospital. It is a fact that however useless an item might be, unless it is bolted to the floor, it will be stolen.