YP Letters: Scarcity of food from abroad could benefit British farmers

It is claimed that a no-deal Brexit could lead to food shortages.
It is claimed that a no-deal Brexit could lead to food shortages.
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From: Barrie Crowther, Walton, Wakefield.

AS a long-time farmer, I cannot buy into the supermarket and fast food sector’s assumption that food will be both scarce and more expensive with a no-deal Brexit.

What now for Brexit?

What now for Brexit?

Most import cheap food from anywhere they can source it regardless of home-produced products. They would sooner pay air miles than give the British farmer a fair crack of the whip.

Look what happened during the Second World War when we were almost completely cut off from the rest of the world. We survived on the dig for Britain attitude, sadly lacking in this modern generation. Incidentally there could be a lot less obesity if fast food and ready meals were not so freely available.

From: Mr J Bore, Hornsea.

SO far as I can determine from the complexities of the Brexit negotiations, the biggest single stumbling block for the negotiators is the problem of the so-called “hard border” between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

The people on both sides of the border would like it eliminated if and when the United Kingdom eventually leaves the European Union. But should this problem be allowed to severely handicap all the negotiations, or even prevent Brexit happening at all? What is continually overlooked in this debate is that the border is there precisely because the peoples of Ireland instigated the arrangement themselves!

From: F Wright, Normanton.

I VOTED to leave the European Union because I did not want to be a member of the United States of Germany. We fought two world wars to keep Europe free from the Germans. Millions of people were killed or injured and now Angela Merkel has taken over without firing a single shot. Brilliant.

I now want to see our fishing fleets taking over our fishing grounds, and our harbours full 
of trawlers once again.

The Irish problem does not exist, Ireland isn’t going to build any check points and the UK are not, so what’s the problem?

From: Duncan Anderson, Mill Lane, East Halton, Immingham.

YOU reported on the ability of the Humber ports to deal with changes due to Brexit (The Yorkshire Post, January 28). Can I add that the M180 south of Scunthorpe, where it is reduced to two lanes, will not manage.

From: Andrew Mercer, Guiseley.

SHOULD we not be given a referendum on whether we should hold another referendum?