YP Letters: The need to talk is the lifeblood of our lives

An estimated 34,000 older people experience loneliness on a daily basis - recent correspondence has prompted a debate on this issue.
An estimated 34,000 older people experience loneliness on a daily basis - recent correspondence has prompted a debate on this issue.
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From: Mike Purches, Silsden.

FOR the first time to pen a letter to the editor, I feel obliged to defend the statement attributed to Mother Teresa in Brian H Sheridan’s letter (The Yorkshire Post, December 5).

I lost my wife of 43 years to pancreatic cancer four-and-a- half years ago. Looking after her on a 24-hour shift for the last six months of her life enabled me to constantly show her the companionship she craved knowing that she was going to die.

Six months after her death aged 66, I was diagnosed with cancer. My comfort was her bachelor brother, last of her family, and living two to three minutes from me. I devoured his friendship as a remedy for my loss, his sister, and my cancer. Two years ago, he died, aged 67, leaving me well and truly isolated since our two sons live over 200 miles from where I live.

I have had to travel on my own for treatment, whether it is to Leeds or further afield. Coming home to an empty house is almost tortuous. The fridge is 
all but empty until the 
morning.

The bedroom is silent, the kitchen is silent which really hints at the need for Brian to be silent until his repository of wisdom be rectified.

The need to talk is the lifeblood of life and without it we become lifeless in our being.