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Owners of Sheffield fitness shop given suspended sentences for selling illegal steroids

Two men running a Sheffield fitness and supplement shop sold illegal steroids over the counter, and were found to be storing thousands of pounds of the performance-enhancing substance at the premises, a court heard.
Two men running a Sheffield fitness and supplement shop sold illegal steroids over the counter, and were found to be storing thousands of pounds of the performance-enhancing substance at the premises, a court heard.
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Two men running a Sheffield fitness and supplement shop sold illegal steroids over the counter, and were found to be storing thousands of pounds of the performance-enhancing substance at the premises, a court heard.

Sheffield Crown Court was told how the Nutrition Power in Attercliffe Road, Attercliffe was experiencing financial difficulties when the store's co-owners, Naseer Ahmed and Nabeel Kurshid, committed the drug offences in 2015.

"When the financial position of the business altered, he took the opportunity to try and improve it by drug selling and trafficking," Assumpta O'Rourke, defending Ahmed, told Sheffield Crown Court on Tuesday.

The court heard how their offending was brought to light, after a private investigator visited the premises on September 16, 2015, when Ahmed sold him several packets of steroids, which are a controlled drug of Class C, over the counter.

The private investigator recorded the conversation, and took the evidence to South Yorkshire Police, who subsequently raided the shop.

Prosecutor, Matthew Harding, said: "Both men were arrested, and the premises were searched. A controlled drug in the form of steroids were found."

In excess of 300 packets of steroids were seized from Nutrition Power, added Mr Harding.

Police only had the funds to test a third of the drugs, which were found to have a street value of between £11,500 and £11,900, the court heard.

Ahmed, 35, of Renishaw Avenue, Rotherham pleaded guilty to possession and possession with intent to supply a Class C drug while Kurshid, of Westwood Road, Rotherham admitted to permitting a premises to be used for the production of a controlled drug at an earlier hearing.

Mitigating, Ms O'Rourke told the court that Ahmed, a dad-of-three, was of hitherto good character and was someone who contributed to his community.

She added: "He understands he has lost his good character. He's a family man who is supported by his friends and family at court today. His offending has created some difficulties with his family, but they remain supportive of him."

Kurshid was sentenced to over 10 years in prison in 2010 for conspiracy to supply Class A drugs, and was released in 2015, the court heard.

Mr Hudson, told the court that Kurshid had stepped back from the business before the offences took place due to marital problems, and had turned a 'blind eye' to what was going on.

He said: "He was aware that Mr Ahmed wasn't just selling legal supplements, but also drugs of Class C, and he turned a blind eye."

Kurshid still runs Nutrition Power, while Ahmed is currently pursuing other business opportunities, the court was told.

Judge Michael Slater told both men they had 'come close' to an immediate custodial sentence, but said he had just been persuaded to suspended the term of imprisonment in each of their cases.

Ahmed was sentenced to two years in prison, suspended for two years, and was ordered to complete 250-hours of unpaid work.

Kurshid was sentenced to 20 weeks in prison, suspended for 12 months, and was also ordered to complete 50-hours of unpaid work as well as a 15-day rehabilitation activity requirement.