Parkland in front of Yorkshire manor house is home to deer

PIC: Tony Johnson
PIC: Tony Johnson
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The warming reds, oranges and yellows of trees are rather an obvious characteristic of autumn.

But, perhaps lesser known, is that the months of September to November also mark the season of rutting for many deer species, with males - stags or bucks - competing for females - hinds or does.

The lack of antlers indicate it is female deer that are captured in the photograph above, taken at the Wentworth Woodhouse estate in South Yorkshire.

Parkland in front of the Grade I-Listed stately home and its grounds contains a herd of the animals - red deer species according to the Fitzwilliam Wentworth Estate, grazing alongside cattle.

Wentworth Woodhouse country house in Rotherham was built for the 1st Marquess of Rockingham from around 1735, before being passed to the Fitzwilliam family.

Changes throughout its lifetime have seen it utilised by military intelligence during the Second World War, and used as a Women’s Physical Education College for training teachers, and a student campus for Sheffield Polytechnic College, now Sheffield Hallam and University.

In 2017, the house and 87 acres of grounds and parkland was purchased by Wentworth Woodhouse Preservation Trust on behalf of the nation, and the property retains extensive views over former parkland including the deer park and lakes, vested in the Fitzwilliam Wentworth Amenity Trust.

The deer have featured in photographs of many a visitor and walker, including those taking the Trans Pennine Trail, which runs through the parkland.

“The breeding season, on rut, occurs from the end of September to November,” The British Deer Society states in its information about red deer.

“Stags return to the hind’s home range and compete for them by engaging in elaborate displays of dominance including roaring, parallel walks and fighting. The dominant stag then ensures exclusive mating with the hinds.”

Technical details: Nikon D3s AT 240mm focal length, 1/640 sec f 6.3.