'Pathetic' football hooligans in train ambush are sentenced

LEEDS United football yobs left train carriages spattered with blood after attacking Bradford City supporters in an ambush.

The thugs used sticks and planks of wood to carry out the assault as horrified women with small children looked on.

The train driver was also assaulted and windows smashed in the pre-arranged violence at Bramley railway station, Leeds.

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Rival fans clashed after the derby match between the clubs on March 21 last year.

Judge Kerry Macgill branded seven young thugs as "pathetic" and "not proper football fans" as he sentenced them at Leeds Crown Court for violent disorder.

The court heard that around 25 Leeds fans ambushed the train as it pulled into the station at around 6.30pm.

They attacked the train with bottles and pieces of wood before some of the Leeds fans boarded and tried to pull Bradford supporters onto the platform.

Terrified passengers, including small children, were protected by some of the Bradford supporters.

One passenger, however, suffered a gash to the head after being struck by a bottle and the driver was hit with a can as he tried to contact police.

Those involved later bragged about it on the internet.

Seven of them, all from Leeds, were sentenced after they admitted violent disorder.

Ryan Rodley, 21, of Fenshaw Avenue, Morley, the ringleader, was jailed for five years after he also pleaded guilty to causing a barmaid grievous bodily harm by throwing an ashtray at her face in his local pub.

Joel Best, 19, of Brecks Lane, Kippax, who is currently serving a three-year sentence for a separate offence of wounding, was jailed for 18 months.

Joe Deering, 20, of Suffield Road, Gildersome, was jailed for 18 months.

Jordan Bleasby, 19, of Somerville Grove, Killingbeck, and Wayne Johnstone, 18, of Brooklands Lane, Seacroft, were given 12-month suspended sentences, 240 hours' unpaid work and each ordered to pay 180 compensation.

Two other members of the gang, aged 16 and 17 at the time of the incident, were handed community punishments and ordered to pay compensation.

Judge Macgill imposed two suspended jail sentences after hearing how they had good work records and had acted out of character.