This Leeds man is turning a shipping container into a home for the homeless and their pets

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A reformed criminal is converting a shipping container into a home where homeless people with drug addictions can get clean.

Hayden Lee Jessop spent seven weeks in prison in 2013 after getting involved in drugs and violence when he was young.

Hayden Lee Jessop with the shipping container, which he is converting into a temporary home for the homeless. Aiden Ramsdale, in the background, is a current service user of Hayden's charity Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds

Hayden Lee Jessop with the shipping container, which he is converting into a temporary home for the homeless. Aiden Ramsdale, in the background, is a current service user of Hayden's charity Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds

Now 28 and a dad-of-two, Hayden has completely transformed his life and helps others to do the same.

Hayden, from Pudsey, set up Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds and has set about building a micro home to house those trying to get off drugs.

The shelter, which is being built inside a former shipping container imported from Bristol, will be a six-month home for a person on a year's detox programme, in which time the person will be able to learn basic employment skills.

Space will also be provided for their pet, if they have one.

Hayden Lee Jessop, right, inside the shipping container, which he is converting into a temporary home for the homeless. Aiden Ramsgate, left, is a current service user of Hayden's charity Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds

Hayden Lee Jessop, right, inside the shipping container, which he is converting into a temporary home for the homeless. Aiden Ramsgate, left, is a current service user of Hayden's charity Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds

Hayden is planning to expand the project into a camp of eight homes, and the plan is to have those living in the converted container to help build them.

The container is currently based at a storage unit space in Armley and, once all built, Hayden hopes to move them to a designated plot of land.

"The idea is to get the people living in there to help us out", he said.

"We'll get people the help they need, and in return they can repay us by helping to build more homes so we can help even more people."

The shipping container will be used as a six month home for a person on a detox programme to get clean off drugs, and learn employment skills to get back into work

The shipping container will be used as a six month home for a person on a detox programme to get clean off drugs, and learn employment skills to get back into work

One of Hayden's friends has offered to teach catering skills to those on the rehabilitation programme to give them basic skills for work.

"A lot of the people I help have never been in work," Hayden added, "for example if they are from a criminal background and have been in and out of jail".

"Spending time inside changed my life. I went to jail and came out and built a business.

"I was given a second chance, but a lot of young men don't get that."

Timber to clad the inside of the container has been donated by a firm in Halifax, and work is expected to be completed over the coming months.

"What I'd really like is for the council to get on board," Hayden added.

"It would be great if this project could be something people are referred to. I have spoken with the council and they seem prepared to support us with anything to help tackle our homelessness problem."