PMQs sketch: Jeremy Corbyn as the voice of big business pulls us through the Brexit looking glass

Jeremy Corbyn used PMQs to highlight warnings about Brexit from big firms such as Airbus and BMW.
Jeremy Corbyn used PMQs to highlight warnings about Brexit from big firms such as Airbus and BMW.
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We live in a strange world when Jeremy Corbyn is the voice of big business at Prime Minister’s Questions.

But such is the disarray in the Cabinet over Brexit, amplified by Boris Johnson’s “f*** business” gaffe, that Mr Corbyn was presented with another gift to unwrap in the Commons yesterday.

As ever, the Labour leader could have done a better job, allowing Theresa May to attack his plans to increase corporation tax while insisting the Conservatives are the natural party of business.

But as Mr Corbyn highlighted split after split in Mrs May’s top team, who are unable to agree a way forward for Brexit, and warning after warning from huge firms such as Airbus and BMW about the damage delays are causing, it was difficult for the PM to look authoritative.

At one bizarre juncture, Mrs May highlighted Mr Corbyn’s opposition to expansion of Heathrow Airport by quoting Unite general secretary Len McCluskey, completing the ‘through the looking glass’ feel of proceedings.

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As the angry exchanges continued, some backbench Tories attempted to shout down Mr Corbyn while others tried to laugh it off.

But the glum faces of the majority, who want the Government to get on with a sensible Brexit, said it all.

SNP footstomper Ian Blackford, perhaps so perplexed by the Tory-Labour role reversal, began his questions with: “Mr Government, this Speaker has completely failed to listen to business...”

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In the end it was Wakefield MP Mary Creagh who turned the knife, asking Mrs May if she would “join in congratulating the Foreign Secretary for expressing so pithily what her hard Brexit will do to British jobs and British businesses”.

As often seems to be the case these days, little was learnt about the PM’s Brexit approach ahead of the big EU summit today.

But at least Mrs May committed to flying the St George’s Flag from Number 10 for England’s World Cup match against Belgium, for what promises to be a far more engrossing clash with Brussels types.