Collins Dictionary reveals the 10 words brought to prominence by Brexit - including 'milkshaking' and 'cakeism'

0
Have your say

The act of dousing public figures in milkshake has been officially recognised on a 10-strong list of words brought to prominence by Brexit, which has been issued for the first time by Collins Dictionary.

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage had a milkshake thrown at him in May during a campaign walkabout in Newcastle.

A 10-strong list of words brought to prominence by Brexit has been issued for the first time by Collins Dictionary. Credit: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images

A 10-strong list of words brought to prominence by Brexit has been issued for the first time by Collins Dictionary. Credit: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images

English Defence League founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, known as Tommy Robinson, and Ukip candidate Carl Benjamin have also been involved in "milkshaking" incidents.

Climate Strike was named Collins's Word Of The Year for 2019, described as "a form of protest that took off just over one year ago with the actions of Swedish schoolgirl Greta Thunberg and which has grown to become a worldwide movement".

Collins said the term was used on average 100 times more in 2019 than the previous year.

Dubbed the Brexicon, the list of Brexit-inspired words also includes Brexiteer, described as "a supporter or architect of the withdrawal of Britain from the European Union".

It comes after Collins Dictionary named Brexit its word of the year for 2016.

Brexiety, which is "a state of heightened anxiety triggered by concerns about the imminent withdrawal of Britain from the European Union", also features on the list.

The term cakeism - trying to have your cake and eat it - is also recognised, having been used by Remainers and Brexiteers to describe their rivals.

It is defined as "a wish to enjoy two desirable but incompatible alternatives".

'The North-South divide caused Brexit, now leaders must come to the North to win December's General Election'
GPS tracking apps, panic alarms, and a ban on after-dark canvassing - the safety precautions taken on Yorkshire's divided campaign trail
Remoaner also features in the Brexicon, described as a "derogatory term" and "a person who continues to argue that Britain should remain in the European Union despite the result of the referendum of 2016".

The list also features now-common words or phrases such as no-deal, Project Fear, stockpiling and prorogue.

Collins language consultant Helen Newstead said: "The dictionary has no opinion on Brexit, other than to say it has been quite generous in its gifts to the English language, as well as I am sure inspiring the use of many old-fashioned expletives.

"The Brexicon could be even longer, but we feel our selection sums up many of the key themes since Collins named Brexit word of the year in 2016.

"As the process continues through this latest flextension, no doubt more words will emerge until we come to a Brexend."

New deal with Europe and second referendum within in six months is 'realistic and do-able', claims Jeremy Corbyn
Yorkshire MP 'terrified' at prospect of missing out on £22,000 payout if she loses seat after she moved party and constituency
Collins Dictionary has released a list of words which have come into use since the EU referendum of 2016.

Collins said the 10-strong list, dubbed the Brexicon, marks "the latest chapter of the Brexit story" and details the "10 words that Brexit has brought into prominence, for better or worse".

This is the full list:

- Brexiteer - noun - a supporter or architect of the withdrawal of Britain from the European Union

- Brexiety - noun - a state of heightened anxiety triggered by concerns about the imminent withdrawal of Britain from the European Union

- Cakeism - noun - a wish to enjoy two desirable but incompatible alternatives

- Flextension - noun - An informal agreement to extend the time allowed for payment of a debt or completion of a contract, setting a new date that can be altered depending on future events

- Milkshake - verb - to throw a milkshake or similar drink over a public figure to humiliate him or her

- No-deal - adjective - denoting a situation in which two parties fail to reach an agreement about how to proceed

- Project Fear - noun - a name given to any political campaign that seeks to arouse public alarm about proposed changes to the status quo

- Prorogue - verb - to discontinue the meetings of (a legislative body) without dissolving it

- Stockpiling - noun - the activity of acquiring and storing large quantities of goods

- Remainer - noun - a person who believes Britain should remain in the European Union. See also the related derogatory term, Remoaner - noun - a person who continues to argue that Britain should remain in the European Union despite the result of the referendum of 2016