Severely eroded Three Peaks route repaired in the Dales after public pitches in to save route off Whernside - Yorkshire's highest peak

0
Have your say

A severely eroded footpath that challenged weary walkers on the route from the summit of Yorkshire’s highest mountain has now been re-built after a successful fundraising campaign.

Locally-quarried stone has been used to mend the Bruntscar path on Whernside, with the work paid for using £46,000 raised in donations by individuals and businesses.

Walkers on the newly repaired Bruntscar path which winds off the peak of Whernside in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Picture by Andy Kay/ Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority.

Walkers on the newly repaired Bruntscar path which winds off the peak of Whernside in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Picture by Andy Kay/ Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority.

READ MORE: Weekend Walk - Whernside Circular
READ MORE: Revised map creates Yorkshire’s newest mountain in Dales
The ‘Pitch in for Whernside’ campaign was launched by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority in November 2017 as part of the British Mountaineering Council’s (BMC) national Mend Our Mountains appeal.

The section of the peak's walking route was desperately in need of attention due to the sheer numbers of walkers who have contributed to its erosion.

Now the repairs have been done, Whernside the first of 13 projects in the BMC appeal to be completed.

Carey Davies, the BMC’s hill walking development officer, said: “Whernside isn’t just a mountain. Like Penyghent and Ingleborough, it is a cultural landmark enjoyed by tens of thousands of people every year, often as part of the Three Peaks challenge.

Whernside looming in a cover of snow, with Ribblehead Viaduct in the foreground. Picture by Bruce Rollinson.

Whernside looming in a cover of snow, with Ribblehead Viaduct in the foreground. Picture by Bruce Rollinson.

“Unfortunately, places like this don’t look after themselves. Erosion is a serious threat to popular landscapes all across Britain and fixing it requires money, skill and commitment.”

Nick Cotton, the National Park Authority’s champion for recreation management, said the new stone pitching uses much larger, local stone that is positioned in a random style, allowing people to pick and choose where they step.