These Yorkshire high streets are among the healthiest in Britain

The high streets in York, Harrogate and Wakefield have been recognised in the top 20 in the country.
The high streets in York, Harrogate and Wakefield have been recognised in the top 20 in the country.
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Three of Yorkshire's high streets have been named among the healthiest in Britain, according to the Royal Society for Public Health.

The high streets in York, Harrogate and Wakefield have been recognised in the top 20 in the country.

READ: Yorkshire hosts three of the Britain's top ten 'unhealthy' high streets
Research by the Royal Society for Public Health found that residents living in towns with lots of bookies and off-licences die younger than those with plenty of libraries and pharmacies.

Its ranking of 70 high streets found those living in the top 10 healthy areas lived an average of two-and-a-half years longer than those with the 10 unhealthiest high streets.

Edinburgh has come out on top, with Canterbury and Taunton close behind.

York came in sixth spot, with Harrogate in 16th and Wakefiled sneaking in the top 20 in 20th place.

The Yorkshire Post says: High noon for our high streets. Support local shops – or lose them
Here is a list of the 20 most and least healthy high streets, according to the Royal Society for Public Health:

1. Edinburgh

2. Canterbury

3. Taunton

4. Shrewsbury

5. Cheltenham

6. York

7. Brighton & Hove

8. Eastbourne

9. Exeter

10. Cambridge

11. Bath

12. Bristol

13. Leamington Spa

14. Liverpool

15. Salisbury

16. Harrogate

17. Tunbridge Wells

18. Maidstone

19. Carlisle

20. Wakefield

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The research found that 4,000 new fast food outlets had opened across the UK in the past five years - predominantly in poorer areas.

Deprived areas now have five times more fast food shops than wealthy neighbourhoods, the RSPH said.

It showed that vape shops have doubled to 2,000 in the last three years, while the number of empty shops on the high street has increased from below 7 per cent in 2007 to 11 per cent in 2017.