Reservoir in Peak District reduced to stream due to recent warm weather

These unbelievable aerial images show how sweltering temperatures have reduced a once brimming reservoir into a small stream of water.

Dramatic snaps of Howden Reservoir in the Peak District taken yesterday (June 2) capture its large basin dried out under the continuous baking sun.

It is usually filled with over 1.9m gallons of water - but capacity levels plummeted over the course of May, when rainfall levels were at a record low.

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Staggering photos show receded water levels and the bone dry desert-like landscape.

Howden Reservoir in the Peak District

Want more rural and countryside news? Join our dedicated Facebook groupHowever, the dry spell has come to an abrupt end today (June 3), with rain and thunder forecast for large parts of the country throughout the day.

The reservoir sits behind Howden Dam which was took a 12 years to build at the turn of the 20th century.

The dam is of solid masonry construction, and 117 ft tall, 1,080 ft long, and impounds 1,900,000 gallons of water, from a catchment area of 5,155 acres.

Several men died building the colossal dam and are buried at a nearby church.

The reservoir is usually brimming with water

The dam's design is unusual as it includes two of the totally enclosed stone bellmouth overflows - locally named 'plugholes'.

The overflows, which are 80ft in diameter and 15ft deep, originally had walkways around the base.

The tourist hotspot is the lowest of three dams in the Upper Derwent Valley in Derbyshire - with water uses including river control and supply into the drinking water system.

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An aerial image of Howden Reservoir in the Peak District

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The reservoir has dried up following a long period of warm weather.

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