Ali backs Rashid’s Yorkshire white-ball agreement

Yorkshire and England spinner Adil Rashid

Moeen Ali has given his backing to fellow spinner Adil Rashid’s controversial decision to sign a white-ball only contract with Yorkshire.

Speaking after Englands ODI win over New Zealand, in the course of whichm the pair took five wickets for 23 runs, Mooen said Rashid, 30, has been considering the contract move for a while and said his decision was not motivated by money.

“I think it’s something that has been on his mind for a good few months,” said Moeen.

“Sometimes as a player when something just feels right, it might not make sense to other people, (but) it’s something you just have to do. I know there’s a lot of ex-players who give him a bit of stick, but it’s up to him.

“It’s his life, his career.”

Moeen confirmed too that personal goals rather than financial considerations are behind Bradford-born leg spinner Rashid’s switch.

“These days you can afford to do it,” he added.

“Some players may lose a bit of money, but they are still earning enough. For some players, and I know this for Rash, it’s not about the money.”

On the field, in tandem with fellow spinner Rashid, Moeen believes he can keep helping to turn matches England’s way – as they did to undermine New Zealand’s chase at Wellington’s Westpac Stadium.

“I feel as though I can turn a game like that in terms of not just taking wickets but trying to bowl tight – and then the wickets will come.

“We brought the game back into our hands.

“We both knew we were the two guys who were going to win the game, but I didn’t feel pressure to take wickets or anything like that.”

England’s much-improved limited-overs fortunes since the last World Cup have meant the switch to white-ball cricket brings back the feelgood factor.

“Knowing as a team we’re a lot more confident in the one-day white-ball stuff, you just feel you get energised a little bit after those difficult months,” said Moeen.

He is a confidant as well as spin twin for Rashid, and they love hatching plans for opposition batsmen.

“We actually talk a lot with each other, about how we’re going to bowl on this particular wicket, how we’re going to bowl a little bit different to the one in the last game.”

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