Andrew's role under threat at Twickenham

JOHN STEELE presents to the Rugby Football Union his first major review of the governing body today with the position of Rob Andrew expected to be at the top of the agenda.

The RFU's director of elite rugby is the most high-profile figure in the new chief executive's sights as he attempts to streamline the world's most expensive union.

Richmond-born Andrew, a three-time grand slam winner and a Premiership champion as director of rugby at Newcastle, has not enjoyed the same success in a role linking the senior team with the union hierarchy.

England have at times during Andrew's four-year reign been ranked as low as eighth in the world despite their union being the best funded.

He oversaw the dismissal of Andy Robinson and Brian Ashton, but his decision to appoint the then untested Martin Johnson as the coach to steer England through a World Cup cycle is at long last proving to be a wise move following significant improvement since June 2010 that included back-to-back wins over Australia.

Victory over South Africa six weeks ago would have seen them climb back to No 2, though the recent revival may not be enough to save Andrew and the elite rugby department.

Steele has conducted a root-and-branch study of all departments at Twickenham and after presenting his review today, will inform those relevant departments of his proposals tomorrow.

On succeeding Sir Francis Baron last September, Steele immediately began a fact-finding mission into the running of the game in England.

He visited Morley Rugby Club in October and outlined his plans to the Yorkshire Post to 'streamline regulatory procedures' throughout the game.

The first signs of that reform will be set in motion today.

ENGLAND wing Mark Cueto believes there is more to come from Sale Sharks after they moved 11 points clear of Premiership bottom-club Leeds Carnegie with victory over Saracens on Sunday.

Cueto said: "We are delighted with the way things have changed round so quickly. I am sure there are more performances like that to come."