Wimbledon - Ed White: Ivan Lendl and Boris Becker preparing for final rematch 30 years on

Boris Becker on his way to winning one of his three Wimbledon men's titles in the 1980s. Picture: PA.
Boris Becker on his way to winning one of his three Wimbledon men's titles in the 1980s. Picture: PA.
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There was a refreshing sternness to Ivan Lendl’s sudden disappearance as Andy Murray closed out a record fifth Aegon Championships at Queen’s Club last week.

The message was clear; the job had not even begun for the British No 1.

WINNING TEAM: Boris Becker, left, with Novak Djokovic. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA.

WINNING TEAM: Boris Becker, left, with Novak Djokovic. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA.

Grand slam victories are remembered, and in that sense, there lies unfinished business in Lendl’s return behind the scenes.

This year’s tournament marks the 30th anniversary of Boris Becker’s straight sets win over the Czech in the Wimbledon final in 1986.

That both heavyweights could meet again at opposite sides of Centre Court adds a fine edge to the intriguing rivalry between their respective charges, Murray and Novak Djokovic.

Lendl’s steely face was in Murray’s corner when the 29-year-old finally ended the wait to replace Fred Perry as the last British Wimbledon gentlemen’s singles champion.

Andy Murray is reunited with his coach Ivan Lendl, one of Boris Becker's long-time playing rivals in the 80s and 90s. Picture: Adam Davy/PA.

Andy Murray is reunited with his coach Ivan Lendl, one of Boris Becker's long-time playing rivals in the 80s and 90s. Picture: Adam Davy/PA.

It is unquestionable that Murray forces the play against his opponents more under Lendl’s watchful eye than Mauresmo, Bjorkman, Corretja, MacLagan, Gilbert and Petchey before.

A willingness to flatten out his forehand will prove decisive if, and when, the British No 1 meets up with old friend Novak Djokovic again.

The word unbeatable is often labelled alongside Djokovic and as holder of the four slams, and 12 to his name in total, few would bet against him securing a hat-trick of wins at SW19.

A straight sets defeat to Belgium prospect David Goffin at The Bootles exhibition last week will have done nothing to deter his thoughts of extending his 14-match Wimbledon winning streak to 21.

Off the back of a first French Open win, Djokovic may take time to adjust to the crisper grass but that will pose no barriers should a match-up against Murray adorn our screens in two Sundays’ time.

Like the Lendl factor, Milos Raonic’s link-up with John McEnroe, who has previously stated his availability to Murray, shows a distinct readiness to join the elite.

The tall Canadian will be a danger to everyone especially with the mix of heavy groundstrokes and booming serve.

Raonic is the best of the rest climbing towards the ‘big four’ of which Roger Federer cannot be discounted for one final Wimbledon showpiece.

In terms of British representation, the days of reliance on Andy Murray’s shoulders past the first Tuesday is nearing a close.

Beverley’s Kyle Edmund joins Slovenian-convert Aljaz Bedene as realistic propositions to move past the opening stages while in the women’s event, Johanna Konta, Heather Watson and the returning Laura Robson all stake claims, too.

Seeded 17, Konta presents the best chance to spark a British frenzy upon the old Henman Hill although the Australian-born player has not progressed past the first round in four attempts.

Edmund’s stock grew when taking a set off Andy Murray at Queen’s Club, while also pushing box-of-tricks Ukrainian Alexandr Dolgopolov close in Nottingham.

The 21-year-old looks at home on the grass despite a preference for clay but, like Konta, has yet to win a match in front of the Wimbledon crowd.

The 2016 championships look set to be a breakthrough event for Edmund, who has risen to a career high world ranking of 68.

So when the clatter of 50,000 feet brings the start of the championships today, there will be plenty to feel hopeful about.