Jarvis’s art trail helps to reveal a different class of history in Peaks

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Almost 90 years after the famous mass trespass which saw walkers scuffle with gamekeepers to gain access 
to the highest point in the Peak District, former Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker has helped launch a new art trail to mark the event.

The Be Kinder trail – which officially begins on Saturday – is aimed at getting people visiting Kinder Scout to “see beyond the green and pleasant” to the sometimes hidden histories that lie beneath.

Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker at the National Trust BE KINDER walking trail preview in Erdale with Turner Prize winning artist Jeremy Deller. 'Picture Jonathan Gawthorpe

Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker at the National Trust BE KINDER walking trail preview in Erdale with Turner Prize winning artist Jeremy Deller. 'Picture Jonathan Gawthorpe

It was created by Cocker and Turner Prize-winning artist, Jeremy Deller in collaboration with the National Trust, which acquired the moorland in 1982, and other artists.

Cocker first experienced the 2,090ft peak on a school trip and fell in love with the place. Forty years on he still finds Kinder Scout “is somewhere I can come and never get bored of”.

The walk winds its way along a route stretching almost two miles from the tiny railway station in Edale to the foot of the plateau of Kinder Scout.

Starting at the Penny Pot 
café next to Edale’s railway station, walkers will be able 
to hear protest songs on a jukebox by Scottish-born artist Ruth Ewan, including The Manchester Rambler by singer-songwriter Ewan MacColl, which was inspired by his participation in the mass trespass.

The trail, includes works by writer Jon McGregor, whose novel, Reservoir 13, was written in and inspired by the area, while art duo INSTAR have been working with local schools and community groups to design limited edition sew-on patches inspired by a love of the countryside.

The Kinder Scout trespass of April 24, 1932, saw three groups set out to trespass on the peak, approaching from different directions.

It was part of a campaign 
that is credited with forging 
the way to open access to 
the countryside and the 
creation of the UK’s national parks – of which the Peak 
District was the first in 
April 1951.