What is the difference between pylons dotted across rural landscapes and wind turbines? - Yorkshire Post Letters

From: Dave Ellis, Magdalen Lane, Hedon.

What is the difference in the rural landscape between towering wind turbines and pylons carrying electric cables above ground level, or taller warehousing required for companies to store online shopping for fast daily distribution to customers?

There are examples in other parts of the United Kingdom of pylons being disguised as trees.

Pylons don't need to be a ugly bright steel colour.

'What is the difference in the rural landscape between towering wind turbines and pylons?''What is the difference in the rural landscape between towering wind turbines and pylons?'
'What is the difference in the rural landscape between towering wind turbines and pylons?'
Hide Ad
Hide Ad

There are peers like Baroness McIntosh of Pickering who clearly don't like pylons, as she has voted against having them in the rural landscape in her former constituency, when she was MP for Pickering and Malton (The Yorkshire Post, July 1, 2023).

If the National Grid took up Baroness McIntosh proposals of either putting the cables below ground level, or building a series of mini nuclear plants, it could cost many more millions of pounds, which would be passed onto the customer resulting in the cost of electricity remaining higher for a longer period of time, than it needs to be, due to higher capital cost of building infrastructures.

It is vitally important that the National Grid boosts home-grown electricity in order to make Britain less reliant on neighbouring countries for the supply of electricity.

Unfortunately the prolonged Ukrainian war and seasonal storms in February 2023 has highlighted our dependency on imports of electricity and gas.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

There are opportunities for growers of covered salad crops, who produce cucumbers, tomatoes and lettuce who have plant nurseries in the Cottingham area, to potentially tap into cheaper electricity.

But, for this to happen then these small, often family growers, need grants from central government to adapt the present heating systems.

Growers of covered salad crops in the Netherlands are supported by their government, so why doesn't the British government make the country more self-sufficient in growing delicious food crops out of the natural growing season?

With the help of the major supermarket chains buying at a decent price for the grower and the government in helping training staff in commercial horticulture and agriculture before this sector of home-grown food production completely disappears, it can make a difference. With growers struggling to make a decent profit to survive, the alternative is 'throwing in the towel' and selling the land off for house building.

Baroness McIntosh of Pickering needs to look at the cost implications for the residents of the United Kingdom, which she obviously hasn't done now that she stood down as a member of parliament.