King Charles III: Proclamations heard for new monarch across Yorkshire

From the shores of Scarborough to the streets of Sheffield some 90 miles away, the people of Yorkshire came out in their thousands yesterday to hear the proclamation: Charles III is your King.
Proclamation for the new King 
King Charles III   at Leeds Civic Hall sun 11-09-2022
the Under Sheriff of West Yorkshire David Barraclough reads the ProclamationProclamation for the new King 
King Charles III   at Leeds Civic Hall sun 11-09-2022
the Under Sheriff of West Yorkshire David Barraclough reads the Proclamation
Proclamation for the new King King Charles III at Leeds Civic Hall sun 11-09-2022 the Under Sheriff of West Yorkshire David Barraclough reads the Proclamation

As in similar ceremonies of ages past, tears were shed and hats were doffed as the proclamations - mostly read by civic dignitaries - were announced in the hours after each capital of the four nations made their own declaration.

But unlike the last time such ceremonies were held - in 1952 on the accession of Queen Elizabeth II - members of the public were able to record the moment for themselves on their mobile phone.

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In Sheffield, hundreds of people stood in silence outside City Hall as the proclamation of the new King was read for South Yorkshire.

Around 300 people sang the newly worded national anthem – with some initial hesitancy – after the proclamation was read by South Yorkshire’s High Sheriff, Lieutenant Colonel Mac McPherson.

The crowd found its voice by the end of the anthem before noisily joining in with the Lord Mayor of Sheffield, Sioned-Mair Richards, as she gave three cheers for the King.

The formalities in Barker’s Pool began in the sunshine when the city’s civic leaders and MPs filed out of the City Hall on to the outside steps and a lone civilian trumpeter gave a fanfare.

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The proclamation party and the crowd then waited for the Town Hall clock to strike one before the Lord Lieutenant, Professor Dame Hilary Chapman, introduced the High Sheriff.

Royal Navy veteran Mark Ellwood said he thought it was important the proclamation ceremony was performed around the UK.

He said: “It gives everybody a chance to be able to witness what’s going on and to be part of it.

“For people like us, who can’t get down to London, we’ve got a chance to be here for this on this historic day.”

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His friend, former soldier Adrian Simmons, added: “I think everybody is a bit like me, shocked.

“It’s just not sunk in yet.

“It might do after the proclamation today.

“This is living history being made.”

Allan Wisbey, 93, said he can remember the death of George V and was determined to be in the city centre for the proclamation.

He said: “It was done with great dignity and quite properly. We don’t want everything done in London.”

Mr Wisbey’s wife, Hilda, 91, added: “It took us back to when we watched the coronation of the Queen. We saw that on a very, very small television.

“It’s important to mark these historical events.”

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In Leeds, Lord Lieutenant Ed Anderson - the King’s representative in West Yorkshire - spoke of the continuity of the Crown being passed forward in ancient tradition.

He said: “Our sadness at this time is shared throughout the globe.

"But the basis on which our monarchy is built can ensure that through the centuries the crown has passed in an unbroken line of succession.

"The ceremony is rooted in history going back many hundreds of years and goes back to times where news had to be spread around the country via word of mouth.”

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Two ceremonies were held in York, one outside the city’s courts - the traditional Eye of York and heart of the ancient Ridings - and at Mansion House in the city centre.

Three “York cheers” were led by dignitaries who lined up to hear the proclamations.

Scarborough, Northallerton, Harrogate and Selby also heard their own proclamations given.