Sikh statue unveiled in Yorkshire to honour soldiers

The stunning Indian bronze statue was revealed at Greenhead Park in Huddersfield.
The stunning Indian bronze statue was revealed at Greenhead Park in Huddersfield.
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A statue of a Sikh soldier has been unveiled in Yorkshire to commemorate the thousands of Sikhs who fought and died in World War One and World War Two.

The stunning Indian bronze statue was revealed at Greenhead Park in Huddersfield.

The unveiling of the Sikh statue in Huddersfield.

The unveiling of the Sikh statue in Huddersfield.

As well as being symbolic to those who fought in both World Wars, the statue also recognises the role Sikh soldiers continue to play in the armed forces to this day.

The statue, which has cost in the region of £65,000, has been made possible thanks to generous donations from members of the public and was commissioned by the Sikh Soldier

Organisation (SS0), with the support of the Army, the Royal British Legion and Kirklees Council.

A special ceremony was held to unveil the statue on Saturday and it now takes pride of place in West Yorkshire.

The stunning Indian bronze statue was revealed at Greenhead Park in Huddersfield.

The stunning Indian bronze statue was revealed at Greenhead Park in Huddersfield.

The SSO revealed Huddersfield had been chosen to display the monumental statue due to its “vibrant” Sikh community.

More than 83,000 Sikhs were killed and many more wounded during both World War One and World War Two.

Kalvinder Bhullar, of the SSO, described the artwork as an “emotional piece” and a “stunning sculpture”.

He also praised the public for their support.

He said: “We’ve accomplished our mission to get the statue put in place and the support we have had has been overwhelming.

“Huddersfield’s vibrant Sikh community is one of the reason’s whey the town has been chosen dor the perfect location of the statue.

The statue, which is around 6ft high, was unveiled to dignataries from across the county on Saturday with a special ceremony to mark its permanent home in the West Yorkshire town.