Cressida Dick resigns - acknowledges 'damage' Sarah Everard case has done to trust in Metropolitan Police

Dame Cressida Dick has resigned as the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police following a string of controversies that had damaged trust in the capital’s police force.

File photo dated 02/11/20 of  Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick, leaving Downing Street, central London
File photo dated 02/11/20 of Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick, leaving Downing Street, central London

The chief was effectively forced out by Mayor of London Sadiq Khan who said he was “not satisfied” with her response to the changes needed to “root out the racism, sexism, homophobia, bullying and discrimination and misogyny that still exists”.

The murder of York-raised woman Sarah Everard by a serving officer and the force’s subsequent reaction is among a number of incidents that had “tarnished” Scotland Yard’s reputation in recent months.

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In a statement Dame Cressida acknowledged the damage the case had done.

She said: “The murder of Sarah Everard and many other awful cases recently have, I know, damaged confidence in this fantastic police service.

“There is much to do – and I know that the Met has turned its full attention to rebuilding public trust and confidence.”

After nearly five years in the top job, Dame Cressida admitted last night that Mr Khan “ no longer has sufficient confidence in my leadership to continue” and she was left with “no choice but to step aside”.

Mr Khan said: “Last week, I made clear to the Metropolitan Police Commissioner the scale of the change I believe is urgently required to rebuild the trust and confidence of Londoners in the Met and to root out the racism, sexism, homophobia, bullying, discrimination and misogyny that still exists.

“I am not satisfied with the Commissioner’s response.

“On being informed of this, Dame Cressida Dick has said she will be standing aside. It’s clear that the only way to start to deliver the scale of the change required is to have new leadership right at the top of the Metropolitan Police.”