Why we took to the streets of London to stand up for Brexit – Yorkshire Post letters

0
Have your say

From: Keith Punshon, Dalton, Thirsk.

My wife and I attended the Parliament Square Brexit protests on Friday. Many of the people we met were ordinary folk who had never attended a rally in their lives. In earlier times you would have described us as working class, not Islington elite socialists.

Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage at the March to Leave protest in Parliament Square, Westminster, London. Picture: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage at the March to Leave protest in Parliament Square, Westminster, London. Picture: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

A trade unionist speaker, Clare Fox, Brendan O’Neill, Kate Hoey made great speeches, as well as Nigel Farage, Julia Hartley-Brewer, Ian Paisley Jr, Mark Francois and Tim Martin of Wetherspoons. From the right to the left, from entrepreneur to trade union their fight for Brexit has become a united cross-party struggle for democracy.

Tommy Robinson’s supporters were there, but it wasn’t all that our stolen Independence Day rally was about.

Frankly we didn’t see him as we chatted happily with the police.

Great atmosphere. Ordinary folk wanting their votes to actually count and not sell out Northern Ireland.

From: Eric Daines, Skelton, York.

I THOUGHT that the speech by Donald Tusk wishing ‘a special place in hell’ for those supporting Brexit was completely out-of-order and he should be completely ignored.

The behaviour of all these so-called dignitaries in the EU has left a lot to be desired and has convinced me that although I voted Remain I would not do so again, given a second chance.

The reference to David Cameron being the closest to the flames in Tony Rossiter’s article (The Yorkshire Post, March 29) is equally bad form. There are more than a few politicians whom I have grown to dislike. However, I would not wish bad things to happen to them personally – only that they are not elected in the future.

From: Paul Emsley, Hellifield.

GIVEN the complete inadequacy of the ways in which members of the House of Commons advised their constituents about membership of the European Union before the June 2016 referendum, why should the UK public now feel that their current MPs are any better placed to deliver Brexit, after their recent rejection of the Prime Minister’s managed Brexit plan?

We should remember that not all members’ views reflect the way in which their constituents voted, in 2016. Being a Remainer, but accepting the 2016 result, I believe that the most democratic option now is to call a general election based on a single policy manifesto. At least that way, we can get rid of the self-opinionated Speaker at the same time.