Psychologist believes TikTok trend ‘Lucky Girl Syndrome’ may actually have some legitimacy in its approach

Could lucky girl syndrome be a TikTok viral that actually has a degree of science involved in it?

A TikTok trend that has gone viral, which centres on a manifestation technique that supposedly gives those using it a wealth of good luck, maybe psychologically proven to work. As over 87 million TikTok users have viewed the trend on the social media platform, one psychologist believes there is “something in it”.

Dr. Samantha Weld-Blundell from The Little Psychology Company explained the science and theory behind lucky girl syndrome and feels that the techniques used aren’t as unbelievable as many may think a viral trend might boast.

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Taking to her TikTok profile, Weld-Blundell explained “Language we use creates our reality. This is a long-standing theory by lots of researchers and psychologists. If we have the vocabulary and we’re able to label and name things we expect them more, we are looking for them, we talk about them more, and that idea is shared.”

She continued, “also if we say positive things out loud that is informing and changing our thoughts, we are literally putting thoughts in our head, positive thinking. Sometimes that can be beneficial when we’re trying to overcome negative automatic thoughts, so these types of affirmations that we’re seeing are changing our thoughts, this changes the way we feel and informs our emotions which have an impact on how we behave and respond and our actions.”

Dr. Weld-Blundell summarised her belief that the trend does have some merits, concluding that “by saying positive things out loud changes our thoughts, which changes our thoughts and feelings, and informs our actions and behaviours.”

Lucky girl syndrome is described as a technique used to manifest positive feelings and acknowledge a personal level of self-belief by reminding yourself every day that you are a lucky person and that only good things happen to you. The manifestation technique was well documented after the release of The Secret by Rhonda Byrne in 2006, which went on to become an international bestseller.

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