Manchester bombing anniversary: Prince William calls for change in the way child victims of trauma are treated

Prince William says Manchester Arena bombing survivors “must have their voices heard” and calls for change after terror attack victims left without mental health support.

The Prince of Wales called for change in the way child victims of trauma are treated on the anniversary of the Manchester Arena bombings, which took place in 2017. A report found 29% of children involved in the attack received no mental health support and some were told it would “make them stronger.” 

The report, titled Bee the Difference, found that three-quarters of children and young people affected by the 2017 terror outrage were psychologically injured by what happened to them. However, four in 10 were not offered any support. 

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In response, Prince William said: “This report makes clear that young people who have experienced the trauma of terrorism have needs unique to age. These are minds that need the space to have their voices heard and their feelings acknowledged.

“We must listen to their stories now, in order to learn for the future. I look forward to seeing the change it creates.” 

Twenty-two people were murdered and hundreds more injured when suicide bomber Salman Abedi detonated an explosive device in the foyer of Manchester Arena at the end of an Ariana Grande concert on May 22, 2017. The Bee The Difference report, launched on Monday, is a research project designed by and for young survivors of the arena attack in collaboration with UK disaster response charity the National Emergencies Trust, of which Prince William is a patron. 

Prince William's emotional tribute to King Charles at the coronation concert at Windsor Castle also included a heartbreaking nod to Queen Elizabeth II - Credit: GettyPrince William's emotional tribute to King Charles at the coronation concert at Windsor Castle also included a heartbreaking nod to Queen Elizabeth II - Credit: Getty
Prince William's emotional tribute to King Charles at the coronation concert at Windsor Castle also included a heartbreaking nod to Queen Elizabeth II - Credit: Getty | Getty Images

More than 200 young survivors took part in the research for the Bee The the Difference report, all of whom were under 18 at the time of the attack, some of which were physically injured in the bombing. The report reveals that while 93 per cent of young survivors felt they needed support in the aftermath of the attack, 70 per cent received no professional help within the first month and 31 per cent received no professional help within the first year. 

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