Pair of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation chairs set to fetch up to 6k at Chiswick Auctions

The pair of chairs up for auction were a part of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation back in 1953

As we approach the first coronation of a British monarch in 70 years, furniture from the last one is set to fetch thousands at auction. A pair of chairs from the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II are expected to achieve thousands at auction. 

The green velvet chairs with gold embroidery are marked with the late Queen's royal cipher 'E:R'. They are expected to fetch between £4,000 - £6,000 at auction in London. 

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The pair of well maintained seats marked as 376 and 420 are two of 2,000 chairs and 5,700 stools, made of limed oak and beech, made for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in June 1953. Attendees of the Queen's coronation were given the opportunity to buy their chairs after the coronation as part of a royal tradition - but very few have ever been sold at auction.

Older chairs made for the coronation of King George VI in 1937 have in the past sold for £2,000-3,000. The seats are part of a wider auction of royal memorabilia celebrating the coronation held by Chiswick Auctions at the Barley Mow Centre in Chiswick, London.

Other items include a series of signed royal portrait photographs by Dorothy Wilding (1893-1976), expected to fetch a four-figure sum. A letter of thanks signed by King Charles and Queen-Consort Camilla from April 9, 2005 is also up for grabs.

The two chairs from Queen Elizabeth II's coronation (Photo: SWNS)The two chairs from Queen Elizabeth II's coronation (Photo: SWNS)
The two chairs from Queen Elizabeth II's coronation (Photo: SWNS) | SWNS

As are signed photographs of Diana, Princess of Wales, and an image depicting the late Princess in a head and shoulders pose, signed and dated 1989. To find out more about the collections, visit Chiswick Auctions

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