Optimism for normality lower in single adults in Yorkshire than anywhere else in UK, data reveals

Optimism levels of single adults in Yorkshire of when life will return to “normal” following the pandemic have fallen further than anywhere else in the country.

In the first lockdown last Spring, 61 per cent of single adults nationally questioned said life would return to normal in less than a year

In the first lockdown last Spring, 61 per cent of single adults nationally questioned said life would return to normal in less than a year

But by the third lockdown this year, that number had fallen to 51 per cent across the country.

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And in Yorkshire and the Humber, the figures dropped from 75 per cent of single adults expecting normality within a year in first lockdown to just 48 per cent in the latest lockdown.

The data, from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) also reported that households with children most frequently reported they were worried or very worried about the effect of the coronavirus pandemic on their lives, especially in London during spring 2020, where 84 per cent of adults in these households reported this.

The statistics were collected to see if there was any regional differences in experiences of the pandemic, but statisticians said that there were fewer differences than expected.

Anxiety levels in Yorkshire were also monitored and have remained consistent throughout the pandemic with the national average.

55 per cent of people questioned between January and March this year said their anxiety levels were medium or high, only slightly less than 58 per cent of people in the region who said the same during the first lockdown.

An ONS statistician said: ““Looking across the different countries and regions of Britain, there were fewer regional differences in the impact of the pandemic than one might have anticipated. One clear exception was in London, where the proportion of people working from home was far higher than in any other region.

“We did see differences in experience depending on the types of households people lived in, regardless of where they lived. For example, households with children across the nation were the most likely to report feeling worried about the effect the pandemic is having on their lives.”