Ferrybridge demolition: How to watch the big blowdown event at historic West Yorkshire site this weekend

A landmark West Yorkshire site is set to be further demolished this weekend, with a huge blowdown event planned for part of Ferrybridge Power Station. With just days to go until the big event, this is everything you need to know about the blowdown.

The recognisable power station has towered over the towns of Ferrybridge and Knottingley for more than 50 years, and is largely considered a local landmark.

Ferrybridge C, as the site is officially known, opened in 1966, the third power station to stand on the site since 1924.

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At its peak it employed more than 900 people, but rising costs made the site unsustainable, and it closed in 2016.

A landmark West Yorkshire site is set to be further demolished this weekend, with a huge blowdown event planned for part of Ferrybridge Power Station. With just days to go until the big event, this is everything you need to know about the blowdown. Photo credit should read OLI SCARFF/AFP via Getty Images

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Ferrybridge Power Station: Your photos show the demolition of four cooling tower...

Demolition began in 2018, with the first of several major blowdowns in July of the following year, during which one of the towering cooling towers was reduced to rubble with the help of explosives.

In October 2019, thousands of people gathered to watch the main blowdown, which saw four of the remaining cooling towers crumble to the ground in one spectacular event.

But further demolition has now been announced at the site, with more of the recognisable site set to be reduced to dust.

The recognisable power station, pictured in 2015, has towered over the towns of Ferrybridge and Knottingley for more than 50 years, and is largely considered a local landmark. Photo: OLI SCARFF/AFP via Getty Images

This is everything you need to know about the latest demolition at Ferrybridge Power Station.

What is being demolished and when will it happen?

Ferrybridge's most recognisable feature was undoubtedly the eight concrete cooling towers which, at 375ft tall, were visible for miles around.

Three of these remain standing - and you may be relieved to hear that there are currently no plans for their demolition.

Instead, this week's demolition event will centre on the two chimney stacks and main boiler house in the centre of the site.

The big event will take place after 9.30am on Sunday, August 22, with an exact time to be confirmed closer to the day.

How will the blowdown impact me?

As with the previous events, SSE have taken precautions to keep local residents and drivers safe during the blowdown.

Homes will be evacuated, roads closed and planes and drones banned from flying over as the demolition gets underway.

Those affected will have already been contacted by SSE, but it is understood that the exclusion zone, which will be evacuated for safety, will include homes on Kirkhaw Lane, Stranglands Lane and a number of properties within the immediate vicinity of the site.

Marshals will also be in place to enforce a number of road closures ahead of the blowdown.

A portion of Stranglands Lane, between Kirkhaw Lane and the A1(M) motorway underpass, will be temporarily closed from 8am, reopening as soon as practicable after the event.

A rolling road closure will be in place on the A162 and M62 motorways for a period of approximately 15 minutes.

Additionally, a strict no fly zone will be in place, extending to one mile from the site boundary. This means that no unauthorised flights, including drones, will be allowed use the airspace around the site.

Can I watch the blowdown?

No official public viewing area has been allocated for the demolition event, although local residents within the exclusion zone will be able to access facilities in designated areas.

However, Ferrybridge Power Station can be seen for several miles around, and it is expected that people will gather in some areas to watch the event.

The Met Office is currently forecasting cloud and patches of sunshine for Sunday morning, which would ensure visibility from a number of vantage points.

But those who would rather stay at home, a livestream of the event will also be made available on Sunday morning.