Diesel breaks £1.50 per litre barrier for the first time

Further blow to motorists and shoppers as fuel prices continue to climb around the country

The average price of diesel has exceeded 150p per litre for the first time ever, according to the latest fuel price data.

Figures from the AA show that the average price around the UK climbed to 150.5p on Saturday before dipping slightly on Sunday to 150.09p.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

It is the first time the average price of the fuel has topped 150p per litre and comes in the wake of weeks of record-breaking fuel costs.

In October, diesel prices broke the previous record set in April 2012, reaching 147.93p. Petrol also reached a new high last month, hitting a record 144.35p, and both have continued to rise since then.

The AA’s fuel spokesman Luke Bosdet said the rise wasn’t just bad news for drivers filling up at the pumps but also for consumers, who were likely to see higher prices at the shops as retailers pass on their rising operating costs.

He commented: “Diesel setting a record of £1.50 a litre isn’t just yet another milestone along a bleak road of pump price increases this year.

“As the workhorse fuel for deliveries and craftspeople who drive to customers, it will likely usher in even higher costs for goods and services.

“Many bigger businesses have insulated themselves against higher fuel costs with a system of surcharges on deliveries.

“If pump prices go up, their customers pay a percentage more for deliveries, and that gets passed on to the consumer.

“However, smaller businesses, particularly in rural areas, have little choice but to charge shoppers and clients directly. That strains customer relations and potentially puts jobs and contracts in jeopardy.”

The RAC’s Simon Williams added that the latest record-breaking figures were a “miserable milestone” and would exacerbate problems for households already facing soaring energy bills.

He said: “The high prices drivers are having to endure at the pumps is also coming at a time of rising domestic energy costs and in turn inflation, which risks making the coming winter a horrendously expensive one, especially for those on lower incomes.

“The fact used car prices are so high also means that it’s even more costly for many drivers to upgrade to newer, more efficient vehicles to save themselves money. Our advice to all motorists is to shop around for cheaper fuel and drive as economically as possible – doing both these things can help keep costs in check, at least a little.”

Fuel prices have now risen for 10 consecutive months and have gone up more than 30p per litre in the last year. The continued rise has been blamed on rising wholesale costs, a spike in the cost of biofuels which make up part of modern fuels, and the weakness of the pound on international markets.