After 20 years without speech, app gives Kevin 
his voice back

The Disabilities Trust, a leading national charity providing quality care and support for people with severe disabilities, is using new technology to help those in its care.

Kevin Beverley using an iPad at the Carlton daycare centre in Barnsley. The 55 year old who was left paralysed and brain damaged in a brutal attack today said it was "great" to be able to communicate for the first time in 20 years. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo.
Kevin Beverley using an iPad at the Carlton daycare centre in Barnsley. The 55 year old who was left paralysed and brain damaged in a brutal attack today said it was "great" to be able to communicate for the first time in 20 years. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo.

At the Carlton Resource Centre, in Barnsley, it has purchased two iPads as 
well as the Grid Player application, which allows a severely disabled person to string sentences together 
by pressing symbols and pictures on the computer.

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The Disabilities Trust also plans to introduce eye scanners at each of its six Disability Lifestyle Services centres in England. The technology allows disabled users to communicate through a computer 
which tracks movement in people’s eyes.

The trust is in the process of trying to raise the £90,000 required to buy the life-changing equipment, 
which uses infrared technology enabling people with complex physical disabilities to operate a computer just using their eye movements.

Kevin Beverley using an iPad at the Carlton daycare centre in Barnsley. The 55 year old who was left paralysed and brain damaged in a brutal attack today said it was "great" to be able to communicate for the first time in 20 years. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo.