LiveFirst photos from scene of serious crash in New Road Yeadon as police forensic investigations continue

A serious crash has closed New Road in Yeadon, Leeds on Sunday morning

This is the first image from the scene from Yorkshire Evening Post photographer Tony Johnson.

A serious crash has closed a road in Leeds on Sunday morning.

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Police forensic investigators are on the scene of a crash on New Road, at the junction with Dibb Lane and Kirk Lane in Yeadon.

The first photo of the wreck in Yeadon after a serious crash

The force is calling the incident a serious RTC and is asking drivers to avoid the area.

Photos surfacing this morning show a mangled wreck of a car which was involved in the incident.

A spokesman for West Yorkshire Fire & Rescue Service based at Rawdon station said: "Two engines attended, one from Rawdon and one Cookrdige.

"On our arrival ambulance and police were already in attendance, four ambulances and I think six police cars.

The wreck in Yeadon after a serious crash

"The BMW was smashed up, believed to be coming down from the Aldi from Yeadon town centre, towards Dibb Lane.

"When we arrived paramedics were working on a lady, age unknown, and the driver was in the ambulance getting checked over.

"Our crews had to cut a little bit of the metal away so the ambulance crews had more access

"Crews assisted the ambulance crews getting her onto a stretcher where she was taken then to the LGI"

The crash in Yeadon

She was conscious and breathing at the time but potentially could have multiple fractures.”

A spokeswoman for Yorkshire Ambulance Service said: "We got a call at 3.10am to the junction of Dibb Lane and New Road in Yeadon

"We sent two ambulances, a clinical supervisor and a hazardous area response team

"We attended the scene and took two patients to Leeds General Infirmary.

"And we left the scene 4.15am."

A spokesman for West Yorkshire Police said: “ROAD CLOSED - A65 New Road jct Kirk Lane and Dibb Lane, Yeadon, Leeds due to a serious RTC. Please avoid the area.”

Police have been contacted for more details - keep following for more as soon as we get it.

Leeds news live: Saturday, November 21

Last updated: Sunday, 22 November, 2020, 13:36

  • Christmas and Covid: This is what we know right now
  • Serious crash closes road in Yeadon
  • Coronavirus rates are levelling out and may be starting to drop, a leading scientist has suggested
  • People over the age of 50 will be entitled to a free flu vaccine from the beginning of next month as part of an expanded jab rollout in the face of the “twin threats” of flu and coronavirus

Ambulance service confirms times of incident

A spokeswoman for Yorkshire Ambulance Service said: "We got a call at 3.10am to the junction of Dibb Lane and New Road in Yeadon

"We sent two ambulances, a clinical supervisor and a hazardous area response team

"We attended the scene and took two patients to Leeds General Infirmary.

"And we left the scene 4.15am."

Update from Fire Service

A spokesman for West Yorkshire Fire & Rescue Service based at Rawdon station said: "Two engines attended, one from Rawdon and one Cookrdige.

"On our arrival ambulance and police were already in attendance, four ambulances and I think six police cars.

"The BMW was smashed up, believed to be coming down from the Aldi from Yeadon town centre, towards Dibb Lane.

"When we arrived paramedics were working on a lady, age unknown, and the driver was in the ambulance getting checked over.

"Our crews had to cut a little bit of the metal away so the ambulance crews had more access

"Crews assisted the ambulance crews getting her onto a stretcher where she was taken then to the LGI"

"She was conscious and breathing at the time but potentially could have  multiple fractures.”

Police CSI teams on the scene

First photo of the crash in Yeadon

Serious crash in Yeadon closes road - police forensic investigators on scene

A serious crash has closed a road in Leeds on Sunday morning.

Police forensic investigators are on the scene of a crash on Dibb Lane, at the junction with Kirk Lane, in Yeadon.

The force is calling the incident a serious RTC and is asking drivers to avoid the area.

Photos surfacing this morning show a mangled wreck of a car which was involved in the incident.

A spokesman for West Yorkshire Police said: “ROAD CLOSED - A65 New Road jct Kirk Lane and Dibb Lane, Yeadon, Leeds due to a serious RTC. Please avoid the area.”

MORE TO FOLLOW AS WE GET IT

How the Covid Winter Plan will work for Leeds

England will enter a tougher three-tiered system of local coronavirus restrictions when the national lockdown ends on December 2, Downing Street has said

Boris Johnson is expected to detail his plan for winter to MPs on Monday as he sets out how people can see their loved ones at Christmas.

What is the Covid winter plan and how will it affect Leeds?

The “Covid winter plan” is expected to place more areas into the higher tiers to keep the virus under control to ensure further restrictions are not needed, No 10 said.

The tiers are expected to be strengthened to safeguard the gains made during the national lockdown but it is understood that the controversial 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants will be altered under the new system.

Leeds was expected to be placed back into Tier 3 - the strictest tier available - when the national lockdown ends. Leeds was due to go into Tier 3 when the national lockdown was announced, which  over-rode the local system.

But Tier 3 will look a little different to before, and the restrictions on pubs and restaurants including the 10pm curfew could be altered.

The Prime Minister is expected to say that, while last orders must be called at 10pm, people will get an extra hour to finish their food and drinks with opening hours to be extended until 11pm.

The Cabinet is expected to discuss and sign off the plan on Sunday before Mr Johnson announces it to Parliament the following day.

While he will set out how people will be able to spend their Christmas, ministers have made clear that the festive season will be different to normal, with some restrictions expected to remain in place.

Ministers will detail what tier each area will be placed into on Thursday and MPs are expected to be given the vote to approve the new system, as promised by Mr Johnson, in the days before it comes into force on December 2.

They are optimistic that restrictions can be gradually reduced in the run-up to spring. Providing vaccines are approved by regulators, the plan is for the rollout to begin next month before a wider programme in the new year.

But the Prime Minister will be wary of a rebellion from backbench Tory MPs who are opposed to new restrictions.

During a vote on the current four-week system earlier this month, 32 Conservatives rebelled to oppose the measures and 17 more, including former prime minister Theresa May, abstained.

Subsequently, the Covid Recovery Group (CRG) led by former chief whip Mark Harper and ex-Brexit minister Steve Baker has formed to resist new measures.

On Saturday the CRG warned that they “cannot support” a tiered approach unless the Government produces evidence to show measures “will save more lives than they cost”.

The warning against the measures inflicting “huge health and economic costs” came in a letter to the Prime Minister, which sources close to the group said had been signed by 70 Conservative MPs, though the group’s leaders were the only signatories identified.

Downing Street will hope an easing at Christmas, potential vaccines on the horizon and new scientific evidence will lessen the scale of a rebellion, with the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) expected to publish papers on Monday stating that the previous tiers were not strong enough.

But the CRG letter said: “We cannot live under such a series of damaging lockdowns and apparently arbitrary restrictions, and expect our constituents to be grateful for being let out to enjoy the festive season, only to have strict restrictions imposed on them afterwards that cause them health problems and destroy their livelihood.”

The Government announced a further 341 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Saturday, bringing the UK total to 54,626.

Labour has so far been supportive of the need for restrictions to slow the spread of Covid-19, and a full-scale Commons defeat on the plan is unlikely.

But shadow chancellor Anneliese Dodds, in a speech ahead of the Downing Street announcement, said the nation could not be allowed to return “to the shambles we had before this lockdown” in calling for “clarity” on economic support.

A Labour spokesman said “we will look closely at any proposals the Government brings forward” but called for “proper packages of support” for businesses that are unable to fully reopen.

“The previous system was failing – simply returning to it without other measures in place will not work,” he added.

This is why police are in Leeds city centre this morning (Saturday)

West Yorkshire Police confirmed that it has arrested two men as part of an 'ongoing investigation'.

Christmas and Covid: What we know right now

Families could be allowed to join a temporary bubble to meet up over Christmas, it has been reported.

Household mixing is currently subject to harsh restrictions in England under the country’s second lockdown with only support bubbles allowing people from different addresses to mix.

Similar curbs are in force in mainland Scotland, a fresh lockdown will prevent gatherings of more than one household in Northern Ireland from Friday and Wales has rules governing people mixing indoors.

Here, the PA news agency looks at the key questions surrounding a Christmas curtailment of restrictions:

– What is being reported?

Several households – potentially three – could be allowed to create a bubble temporarily between December 22 and 28, with the plans covering all four nations of the UK, according to the Daily Telegraph.

The announcement of the plans – which will allow families to spend up to seven days together – is expected to come next week.

The paper also reported Chancellor Rishi Sunak pushed to have the restrictions eased ahead of December 25 to allow the hospitality sector to benefit from increased trade.

– What else could be allowed under the plans?

Restrictions on church services are also due to be lifted allowing Christmas Day services to be held, the paper said.

Currently, churches will remain open for private prayer only, with Downing Street saying in November that outlawing services inside places of worship is “vital in tackling the spread of the virus”.

– What consequences could follow from allowing more than two bubble households to mix over Christmas?

Public Health England (PHE) suggested earlier this week that for every one day restrictions were relaxed over the holiday, there would need to be an extra five days of tighter rules.

This would mean that an easing of restrictions for seven days between December 22 and 28 would mean more than a month of tighter regulations, according to this formula.

– Does everyone agree on this?

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, the deputy chief medical officer for England, said there was “no magic number” relating to an easing of lockdown and a subsequent period of tighter measures.

He said it was more important people complied with whatever rules were in place if coronavirus infection rates were to be held down.

“There is no magic number about how many days this is going to cost us so we shouldn’t frame it that way,” he added.

– What about care homes?

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has said he wants to have testing for care home visitors in place for all care homes in England “by Christmas”.

A pilot scheme has seen family and friends of people living in 20 care homes across Hampshire, Devon and Cornwall getting access to regular testing to allow them to visit their loved ones.

The scheme, which started this week, will be assessed by experts and the aim is to roll it out to other regions before the end of December.

– Would I be able to go on holiday, or visit my second home for Christmas?

Under the current lockdown rules, people are advised not to travel unless for essential reasons.

People can travel for work and there are exemptions for overnights and second homes for work purposes.

It is not known how this will change when the restrictions lift on December 2.

UK debt hits £2.08 trillion after highest October borrowing on record

Public sector debt reached a new high of £2.08 trillion at the end of October after Government borrowing hit a record £22.3 billion last month, according to official figures.

October borrowing, excluding state-owned banks, was lower than forecast by economists, but still marks the highest October level since records began in 1993 and a £10.8 billion increase year-on-year.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said borrowing for the first seven months of the financial year is now estimated at £214.9 billion – the highest in any April to October period on record.

It means the UK’s overall debt has reached around 100.8% of gross domestic product (GDP) – a level not seen since the early 1960s – as the Government has spent more than £200 billion supporting the economy through the pandemic.

Experts said it leaves the Chancellor facing a difficult balancing act ahead of his spending review on November 25, with Brexit also looming at the end of the year.

Rishi Sunak stressed the UK’s public finances would need to be put on a “sustainable path” over time.

He said: “We’ve provided over £200 billion of support to protect the economy, lives and livelihoods from the significant and far-reaching impacts of coronavirus.

“This is the responsible thing to do, but it’s also clear that over time it’s right we ensure the public finances are put on a sustainable path.”

The figures come amid reports Mr Sunak will use next week’s spending review to limit pay rises for five million public sector workers to help rebuild the public finances.

It is thought he will cap pay rises in the public sector to at or below inflation, though frontline NHS doctors and nurses will likely be exempt from the cap in recognition of their work during the coronavirus pandemic.

The spending review will be accompanied by the latest economic and fiscal forecasts by the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR).

While borrowing in the financial year so far has been less than predicted by the fiscal watchdog, it is still thought to be on track to come near its full financial year forecast of £372.2 billion by the end of March 2021.

Samuel Tombs at Pantheon Macroeconomics said: “The borrowing undershoot is attributable almost entirely to tax receipts in the year-to-date exceeding its forecast by £71.4 billion, due to the higher path for GDP in the second quarter and third quarter than the OBR anticipated.”

He added the borrowing trend will “deteriorate in the winter and the OBR won’t revise down its borrowing forecast next week”.

The ONS data showed Government tax revenues were £39.7 billion last month, down £2.7 billion year-on-year as the pandemic saw falls in VAT, business rates and Pay As You Earn (PAYE) income tax.

Government spending on day-to-day activities rose to £71.3 billion, up £6.4 billion on a year earlier, including £1.3 billion on the furlough scheme and £300 million in Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) payments.

Covid rates plateauing but restrictions should remain after lockdown

Coronavirus rates are levelling out and may be starting to drop, a leading scientist has suggested.

But Professor Neil Ferguson, of Imperial College London, warned social restrictions may need to remain in large parts of England when the national lockdown ends next month to stop infection levels rebounding immediately and undoing any benefits.

The epidemiologist, whose modelling led to the original lockdown in March, told the Guardian infection rates appear to be “plateauing” and may be starting to go down slowly.

He added: “A halving of infection prevalence over the four weeks would be a positive result.”

Prof Ferguson said it was “too early” to tell how much of an impact the second national lockdown will have by December 2 but claimed the previous tier system had made a difference.

He said: “We now have clear evidence that Tier 3 measures were working to bring down infection rates in some areas. Tier 2 was also having an impact, but a smaller one.

“The decision is a political one, but if we don’t want to see infection levels rebound from December 3 my assessment is that measures between Tier 2 and Tier 3 will be necessary in the great majority of locations.”

The Government reported a further 501 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Thursday, bringing the UK death total to 53,775, while there have also been a further 22,915 lab-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK.

It was the second day in a row that the number of deaths had dropped, having fallen from 598 on Tuesday to 529 on Wednesday.

However, the majority of local authority areas in England (197 out of 315) have seen a rise in cases, adding to concerns restrictions may have to continue into the festive period.

University College London’s (UCL) Professor Andrew Hayward claimed allowing a “return to normality” over Christmas posed “substantial risks”, particularly for older people.

The professor of infectious disease epidemiology, and member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said the country was “on the cusp” of being able to vaccinate older populations and it would be “tragic” to throw away the gains made in suppressing coronavirus.

Downing Street has suggested families should be able to meet up after a “difficult year” and Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said on Thursday a final decision will be made as close to the end of England’s national lockdown as possible.

Reports suggest households might be allowed to mix indoors for a five-day period from Christmas Eve, and that ministers are considering plans to allow three or four households to form bubbles.

However, a five-day easing could mean a potential 25-day period of tighter measures into January if the Government was to follow advice from scientists.

It comes as two vaccines are expected to be rolled out before the new year and Oxford University published phase 2 results from its clinical trial into a coronavirus vaccine, showing it produces a strong immune response in older age groups.

Professor Andrew Pollard, head of Oxford’s vaccine trial team, said he was “absolutely delighted” with the results and the jab was “well tolerated” in older people.

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