Time for Independent MPs and Rebel Alliance to fill Brexit vacuum – Yorkshire Post letters

Boris Johnson and Priti Patel, the Home Secretary, during a visit to West Yorkshire Police's headquarters in Wakefield.
Boris Johnson and Priti Patel, the Home Secretary, during a visit to West Yorkshire Police's headquarters in Wakefield.
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From: Donald Wood, Roundacre, Barnsley.

THE Tories were always going to implode with a leader like Boris Johnson. He is a divisive character.

Boris Johnson meeting officers at West Yorkshire Police in Wakefield.

Boris Johnson meeting officers at West Yorkshire Police in Wakefield.

The case for a Brexit government of national unity as Amber Rudd quits – Tom Richmond

The Labour Party is also consumed by infighting with the Momentum group firmly in control. They are communists.

The Lib Dems are having a small recovery but, with the fiasco over student fees, they, too, cannot be trusted.

We must not let fanatical Remainers or a cowardly Jeremy Corbyn win the general election – Bill Carmichael

Brexit protesters outside the Houses of Parliament.

Brexit protesters outside the Houses of Parliament.

This leaves a vacuum in British politics. To fill this void we must have non-ideological people to come forward. The Independent movement could perform this role. Political parties are failing the country, in my opinion. Their time is nearly up and fresh thinking is required.

From: R Bradshaw, Raily Road, Stannington, Sheffield.

IT is indeed ironic that over the last 40 years what I and many others thought was going to be a free trading relationship with Europe has become a political maelstom. The UK has become a vassal state in what many think is an increasingly failing federal conglomerate headed by France/Germany.

Named: The hypocrites and lickspittles in Boris Johnson’s Cabinet shaming politics over Brexit – Tony Rossiter

Margaret Thatcher did her best, David Cameron did give us the chance to vote. The country voted Leave.

I must confess that I voted Remain by post but, as soon as I posted the vote, realised I had made a gross error of judgment and was relieved when the result came through.

We must grasp this opportunity to leave the EU – deal or no deal – in order to make trade deals with the rest of the world.

From: Alan Tidswell, Dacre, Harrogate.

AS I understand it, Jeremy Corbyn believes that the majority of the UK electorate are desperate to get rid of the current Tory government.

He has been calling for a general election to do just that for the past two years.

He also believes that the majority of the UK electorate are opposed to a no-deal Brexit on October 31 and has supported a Bill to prevent the Prime Minister from exiting the EU without a deal. Boris Johnson has stated that the only way out of the Brexit impasse is a snap general election on October 15. Jeremy Corbyn now says that he will not support the request for a general election until the ‘no deal’ is taken off the table and the leave date is extended until January 2020. What I don’t understand is that if Mr Corbyn believes that the British people are with him on both the above issues, then he should have nothing to fear from a poll on October 15.

From: Barrie Crowther, Walton, Wakefield.

EVEN the most diehard Remainer cannot be happy with the £1bn payment gifted to the EU each month from the British taxpayer?

This now appears to be the net contribution regardless of any rebates.

While complaining of poverty and food banks in this country, money is sent to self-serving, unelected bureaucrats in Brussels living the high life at our expense.

I believe this payment amounts to £180 a year for every man, woman and child in this country. Where is the logic to this?

From: Emeritus Professor B. George Hewitt, Doncaster.

MANY congratulations to Jo Johnson, Rory Stewart and Lord (formerly Sir) George Young of Cookham for going at least some way to restore the reputation of their alma mater as regards its contribution to modern-day politics as rated according to the activities of alumni.

In the face of the harm either already visited (or likely to be visited) upon the realm as a consequence of decisions and/or actions leading towards the enactment of (especially a no-deal) Brexit by their fellow Etonians (David Cameron, Boris Johnson, Jacob Rees-Mogg and Kwasi Kwarteng), their actions have been truly noble in putting the best interests of the country ahead of any remaining personal ambitions the trio may have for a future role within the Conservative Party.

From: Peter Rickaby, West Park, Selby.

ENGLAND’S Test cricket woes are easy to explain. Bowlers perform as they wish, batsmen the same, and the captain has as much control over events as Boris Johnson has in 
Parliament.

Answer to empty shops

From: Mrs W Stevenson, Anlaby, Hull.

WITH regard to the empty shops, close the supermarkets and let them use each one for a different commodity. This would be easier for everyone and more friendly. The land should then have houses built on it, but only for affordable houses. It is something long overdue.

This Government has no interest in the poor.

Clear up city’s mess

From: CW Allman, Farsley.

CAN Leeds Council tell me why other places keep everything tidy? I have been on holiday and it’s nice to walk about with no litter, all the parks and grass verges cut with no cut grass piled all over the place to rot.

Then you come back to Leeds and it is a disgrace. We pay council tax for this so let us see where our money is going. Get it cleared up.

Respect places of worship

From: Rosy Moreton, Pocklington.

I ENJOYED reading the article by Tom Ramsden regarding the fate of the region’s churches (The Yorkshire Post, August 26) and agree that church attendance is declining.

I am all in favour of church buildings being used to bring people together so long as it is respected as a place of worship for the few!