Yorkshire village pub has become 'magnet' for anti-social behaviour, say residents

Residents living near to a village pub claim the premises have become a “magnet” for anti-social behaviour and drug taking.

Parish councillors and 13 other people have objected to an application for live music at The Libb, in Ryhill.

The premises licence application is also for recorded music and the sale of alcohol for consumption off the premises.

Opponents of the application say loud music coming from the Mill Lane pub is already causing problems for people living nearby.

The Libb in Ryhill

An objection submitted on behalf of Ryhill Parish Council states: “Because of its very close proximity to residential properties, it is totally inappropriate to play music outdoors.

Residents have already been subjected to extremely loud booming music on quite a number of occasions. This means they cannot enjoy their gardens, or have their windows open in warm weather.

“There have been quite a lot of complaints about this establishment over a period of time.”

The letter also states that residents have complained of drug dealers “swamping to the area” to sell drugs to the pub’s customers.

It continues: “Drug dealers deal quite blatantly on the main street outside the club and also in the car park. West Yorkshire Police are also aware and have apparently also received quite a number of complaints.”

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A letter from one of the residents states: “Many years ago the club was a working men’s club but now it attracts almost exclusively young people. The day-to-day activity is generally not conducive and nurturing a good community spirit but has a negative effect on local people.”

Another objection from a “long-suffering resident” says: “These rules and guidelines need to be tightened enormously so we can all live happily and in harmony with our neighbours.”

The application, submitted by Royboy Ltd, is seeking permission for live music indoors between 8pm and 11pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

It also seeks permission to play recorded music, indoors and outdoors, from 1pm and 11pm on Fridays, noon and 11pm on Saturdays and 11am and midnight on Sundays.

Permission is also sought to serve alcohol for consumption off the premises daily, between 9am and 10pm.

In relation to playing live music, the application document states: “This is only once per month on a Sunday.”

The applicant also states: “Weekend is the only time any music will be played.”

The document states that CCTV is installed inside and outside of the premises.

In relation to the prevention of crime and disorder, it states: “Will never serve alcohol to a minor (over 25s rule). Will never serve alcohol to anyone that seems or is drunk.”

Wakefield Council’s Licensing Sub-Committee will consider the application at a meeting on August 9.