Three classic opening-day fixtures involving Yorkshire clubs

The Premier League fixtures were announced on Wednesday morning, giving fans plenty to look forward to when the season starts in August.

Sheffield United's Brian Deane scores the first ever Premiership goal, versus Manchester United, on August 15, 1992.
Sheffield United's Brian Deane scores the first ever Premiership goal, versus Manchester United, on August 15, 1992.

Previous years have thrown up some memorable openers and here, we look at three of them.

1992: Sheffield United 2 Manchester United 1

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So, not the most classic of matches, but this did feature the first Premier League goal so is worthy of inclusion. Brian Deane scored it for Sheffield United and then added a winner from the spot after Mark Hughes had equalised.

Sheffield United's Brian Deane scores the first ever Premiership goal, versus Manchester United, on August 15, 1992.

Fortunes quickly changed though and the Blades were relegated that season, returning for one more campaign in 2006. Manchester United? They did okay after that.

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2016-17 Fixtures: Middlesbrough

1994: Sheffield Wednesday 3 Tottenham 4

Sheffield United's Brian Deane scores the first ever Premiership goal, versus Manchester United, on August 15, 1992.

This launched what was meant to be a continental new era for Spurs, with Jurgen Klinsmann leading the line after his move from Monaco.

The German delivered, too, scoring and then performing one of the Premier League’s most memorable celebrations - a dive to live up to his reputation.

Spurs ended seventh despite 21 goals from Klinsmann.

1996: Middlesbrough 3 Liverpool 3

It was shirts over your head time at the Riverside as Fabrizio Ravanelli made his Boro debut and marked it with a hat-trick.

The White Feather took on Liverpool’s Spice Boys and nearly came out on top. That proved to be the case in the season overall as he scored 16 goals but failed to stop Boro going down.