Our Yorkshire Farm - what viewers of the Channel 5 show can expect from tonight's episode

Amanda Owen, the Yorkshire Shepherdess, of Ravenseat Farm, North Yorkshire.  with two of her nine children Nancy and Clemmy. Picture: James Hardisty.
Amanda Owen, the Yorkshire Shepherdess, of Ravenseat Farm, North Yorkshire. with two of her nine children Nancy and Clemmy. Picture: James Hardisty.

Viewers of Our Yorkshire Farm will be anticipating tonight's episode as Amanda and Clive Owen continue to tend to their 2,000 acres in Upper Swaledale.

The last episode, the first of the second series, involved the couple's nine children helping during the lambing season in the Easter holidays.

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They also built a dog kennel for their runaway terrier, and saved a lamb with a broken leg.

But now the youngsters are back in the classroom.

In tonight's show, previews reveal how Amanda and Clive swap "traditional roles".

Clive, seen preparing food for the children, says: "She can do what I can do - sheering sheep or whatever, you know, she can drive the tractors, she can drive the machines, she can feed cows."

Amanda Owen tends to her flock. Picture: James Hardisty.

Amanda Owen tends to her flock. Picture: James Hardisty.

The episode also shows the boys repairing a motorcycle, while the girls get excited about the family's new Shetland pony - which they try to fit in a Land Rover.

Mrs Owen previously told the Yorkshire Post about the difficulties of portraying real country life on the show.

She said: "It isn't airbrushed, it isn't choreographed, it's absolutely real.

"For some people that's a problem. You can't win, you see."

One part of the latest hour-long documentary last Tuesday - since watched by more than two million people according to Channel 5 commissioning editor Daniel Pearl - showed two of the children finding a dead sheep and discussing mastitis, a bacterial infection of the udder.

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Mrs Owen said: "It's a really difficult line to take in order to not do any disservice to farmers and people in the countryside. You have to show the realities and that includes dead sheep."

She said "you can't please everyone" and hoped the show would cater for both farmers and wider audiences who do not know about rural life.

"If I can keep those two distinct people happy and not upset either of them, it must be all right," she said.

Tonight's episode airs at 8pm.