Amazon Alexa gets a reyt Yorkshire accent: New update to celebrate God’s Own Country this Yorkshire Day

“Alexa, have you been to Yorkshire?”: “Aye. I went to Betty's for a fat rascal. It wa' champion.” Finally God’s Own Country is represented on Alexa devices for Yorkshire Day. Here’s how you can try it at home.

On a day devoted to showing the world how proud us Yorkshire locals are of our region, Alexa has been given an update to celebrate with us.

The Amazon device can be heard attempting Yorkshire phrases and slang.

Simply ask “Alexa, what are the Yorkshire words for bread roll?” to hear the reply “Ow do. Depending where you are in Yorkshire, you might hear a bread roll called a scuffler, a tea-cake, a bread-cake, or a bun”.

Ask Alexa: Amazon devices get a reyt Yorkshire accent to to celebrate God’s Own Country this Yorkshire Day

Amazon encourages customers to “hear the local lingo,” but we’ll see if you agree with Alexa’s responses by turning on the volume on our video or reading out the commands below.

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Ask Alexa any of the following questions to hopefully hear a Yorkshire-inspired response:

“Alexa, give me a Yorkshire compliment”

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“Now then. Yorkshire compliments include: "champion", "grand", "gradely" and "reyt good".

“Alexa, what are the Yorkshire words for bread roll?”

“Ow do. Depending where you are in Yorkshire, you might hear a bread roll called a scuffler, a tea-cake, a bread-cake, or a bun.”

“Alexa, can you do a Yorkshire accent?”

Summer holiday fun this Yorkshire Day: Sophie Mei Lan with daughters Arianna and Jasmine and their friend Lottie (centre)

“Aye, ‘appen I can.”

“Alexa, have you been to Yorkshire?”:

o “Aye. I went to Betty's for a fat rascal. It wa' champion.”

o “Aye. It wa' a bit parky.”

o “Aye. It wa' fair t'middlin'.”

o “Aye. I've been on Ilkla Mooar baht 'at. I nearly caught my deeath o' cowd.”

o “'Appen I 'ave. It wa' reyt good.”