'Hospitality sector must collaborate to tackle skills shortfall after Brexit'

Dr. Richard Anderson, Head of Learning & Development at High Speed Training
Dr. Richard Anderson, Head of Learning & Development at High Speed Training
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HOSPITALITY firms are being urged to work together to tackle a potential staffing shortfall that could follow a hard Brexit.

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The Yorkshire-based online training provider, High Speed Training, believes the sector must collaborate after new research revealed the possible extent of staffing shortages in the wake of a no-deal Brexit.

The findings of the nationwide study, involving hospitality business owners and managers across the UK, has revealed that 97 per cent are expecting to experience a shortage of labour as a result of hard Brexit. One in six has said that the UK does not have the workforce available to fill the shortfall.

The findings are taken from a new industry report, Preserving the ‘Art of Hospitality’: Championing the Industry for Post-Brexit Survival.

Drawing upon extensive research, the report encourages the industry to work together to ensure the UK maintains its reputation for delivering quality service.

Dr Richard Anderson, the head of learning and development at Ilkley-based High Speed Training, said: “Hospitality has the largest staff shortfall of all UK sectors and a widening skills gap – including a declining number of catering college students and ‘home-grown’ qualified recruits.

“Brexit is accelerating this labour shortage due to the industry’s strong reliance on migrant workers.

“The Home Office has signalled that EU freedom of movement would end immediately in a no-deal scenario, and the effect of this on already challenging conditions has been the focus of debate within the sector.”

Dr Anderson added: “Businesses need contingency plans that consider how the service currently being delivered can be maintained to ensure any negative impacts to the bottom line are minimised.”