These are some of Yorkshire's prettiest traditional estate villages

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They're the villages where time has stood still.

Many of Yorkshire's great country estates still encompass villages where tenanted properties and farms are rented to staff.

Harewood

Harewood

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The houses and cottages often display the distinctive colours and crests of the aristocratic families that own the land.

Some of the old estate villages are no longer tied to the stately home they were built to serve, but retain many of their traditional features.

Wentworth

Wentworth, near Rotherham, is the main village on the Fitzwilliam estate. The Earls of Fitzwilliam owned nearby Wentworth Woodhouse and many of the estate workers were accommodated in Wentworth.

Sledmere

Sledmere

The family's tenure at the house ended in 1979, when the 10th Earl died, although they still own many of the farms and land around Wentworth. The house was also sold and is now in the hands of a preservation trust, who are restoring it as a visitor attraction.

The 10th Earl's grandson, Sir Philip Naylor-Leyland, who lives at the family's Milton Hall property, near Peterborough, inherited the village, 15,000 acres, 40 farms, woodland, a grouse moor and a fishery. There is an estate office in Wentworth and 25 employees still work on the estate. They lease out a number of period cottages and business premises.

Sir Philip and his son Tom also own almost the entire town of Malton - their ancestors bought the borough in 1713 and it is still in the family 12 generations later. Tom has been responsible for the marketing drive that has established Malton as Yorkshire's food and drink capital.

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Sledmere

Ripley

Ripley

Sledmere is the estate village for Sledmere House, near Driffield, which has been the home of the Sykes baronets since the 1700s. The second baronet, Sir Christopher Sykes, moved the entire village as part of his late-18th century expansion of the estate, which also included the enclosure of parkland and extensive tree planting.

Sledmere's cottages are known for their distinctive white paintwork. During World War One, Sir Mark Sykes raised his own corps of 1,000 men from the Sledmere farms, the Wolds Wagoners. He died in the Spanish flu pandemic while at a peace conference in Paris in 1919.

Today, many estate workers still live in Sledmere, which is still in Sykes ownership. The artist David Hockney painted the main road through the village in 1997.

Harewood

Coxwold

Coxwold

The Harewood estate village lies on the main road between Leeds and Harrogate. The Lascelles family, Earls of Harewood, have owned the land since the 1700s and still run the estate today. Their seat, Harewood House, is open to the public.

Although there is plenty of private housing in the village, there are still numerous estate-owned cottages and farmhouses, as well as office suites that can be rented.

Ripley

The Ingilby family have owned the Ripley estate for centuries and still live at Ripley Castle, near Harrogate. In the 19th century, one of the Ingilby baronets tore down the original village and replaced it with a settlement based on the French region of Alsace. A town hall modelled on an hotel de ville was built.

The village pub, The Boar's Head, is estate-owned, but many of the Ingilbys' cottages have been sold on the open market in recent years.

Coxwold

Bugthorpe

Bugthorpe

Coxwold, on the edge of the North York Moors, is often described as the most beautiful village in North Yorkshire. It was part of the Newburgh Priory estate, which was bought by the Bellasis family, later Earls of Fauconberg, after the Dissolution of the Monasteries. They built the Tudor manor house which still stands today. The house passed to the Wombwell baronets in 1825 and the family still live there.

Coxwold is no longer a tied village, but the pub, the Fauconberg Arms Inn, bears the crest of the barons that once owned it. The former parsonage is now Shandy Hall, a museum about the writer Laurence Sterne, who lived there during the 18th century.

Properties on Coxwold are known for their honey-coloured stone.

Dalton Holme

The parish of Dalton Holme, near Beverley, is one of Yorkshire's most traditional estate villages. The two conjoined settlements, South Dalton and Holme on the Wolds, are owned and administered by the Dalton Hall estate. The Hotham baronets have lived at Dalton Hall since the 18th century.

Many of the properties are rented to estate staff, and most of the cottages are built in a Tudor style. Some date back to 1706. The estate office is in South Dalton.

One of the most prominent buildings owned by the Hothams is The Pipe and Glass Inn, the village pub which is under the stewardship of chef James Mackenzie and has a Michelin star.

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Coneysthorpe

The Castle Howard estate, which is still owned by the Howard family, Earls of Carlisle, includes over 170 properties for rent in Ryedale villages such as Coneysthorpe, Slingsby, Terrington and Welburn.

Tenants can lease listed farmhouses and cottages, as well as commercial office space.

Londesborough

The estate village for Londesborough Hall, near Market Weighton, was once owned by the Dukes of Devonshire, whose main seat is at Chatsworth. They acquired the Londesborough property through marriage and the local pub is named The Devonshire Arms in honour of the Cavendish family. A later owner was 'railway king' George Hudson, who built a private station with connections to York to serve the estate before he went bankrupt.

The house is now owned by the Ashwin family, and most of the properties in the village are still tenanted. The local concert hall contains preserved murals painted by POWs during World War Two.

Bugthorpe

Bugthorpe is part of Halifax Estates - a huge business operation owned by the Wood family, Earls of Halifax, whose seat is at Garrowby Hall in the Yorkshire Wolds.

The Woods own 20,000 acres in Yorkshire, spread across five estates. Bugthorpe is home to the main estate office.

Potential tenants of the estate cottages and farms must meet strict criteria - they must be committed to protecting the rural environment and be prepared to get involved in community life. Commuters are discouraged.

They also own the Heslington estate near York, which they bought in 1964. Some of their land is part of the University of York's campus expansion development. Hickleton was the main family seat until 1934, when the first Earl of Halifax, who later served as Foreign Secretary, chose to make Garrowby the primary residence. Hickleton Hall is now a care home but the family still own much of the farmland and properties in the village.

The Woods are well-connected in racing circles, and the Queen has stayed at Garrowby Hall while visiting York Racecourse. They also run a racing stud on the estate.