Obituary: Paul Schatzberger, doctor and photographer

Paul Schatzberger, who has died at 70, was a Sheffield GP, an accomplished violinist and a photographer whose work was exhibited around the world.

Dr Paul Schatzberger

Paul Schatzberger, who has died at 70, was a Sheffield GP, an accomplished violinist and a photographer whose work was exhibited around the world.

Born in Manchester and educated at University College London, he was the son of Austrian Jewish refugees. His grandparents died in Auschwitz.

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He began his medical career as a north London GP but moved in 1983 to Sheffield’s Birley Moor health centre and later to Upwell Street surgery in the Brightside area, where he was a partner. He eventually became lead GP and medical director for north Sheffield, in which role he made an important contribution to improving the health of some of the poorest communities in the city and also championed the development of drug and alcohol treatment services in primary care.

Yet medicine was but one of three strands that ran through his life, and after his retirement in 2007 he turned his attention to fine art photography and music.

Much of what he captured with his camera drew on his medical experience, including a series of images of inner-city Sheffield, aspects of the health service in Cuba and a series on death and dying.

Besides many accolades, his work began to appear in private collections, both in the UK and internationally. He was also a regular exhibitor at Sheffield’s Open Studios and Art in the Gardens events.

At the same time, he played violin in orchestras and chamber ensembles, including the somewhat exclusive European Doctors’ Orchestra, which performed at concert halls across the continent.

He found most enjoyment in collaborating with others and contributed to Sheffield’s music scene, playing with the Hallam Sinfonia. He was performing in virtual ensembles as recently as last autumn.

His musical life transcended genres and included experimental styles of folk and jazz as well as classical music, and he would often play his accordion at gatherings and celebrations.

He is survived by his wife, Angie, whom he married in 1980, and by three children and six grandchildren.