Countdown’s Susie Dent reveals her favourite word is an old Yorkshire term - but have you ever heard it?

TV lexicographer Susie Dent was asked what her favourite word is, and it’s a centuries-old term straight from God’s Own Country.

Susie Dent has revealed her favourite word is 'crambazzled'
Susie Dent has revealed her favourite word is 'crambazzled'

During an appearance on BBC Sounds podcast ‘6 Degrees from Jamie and Spencer,’ Susie, who is usually found in Countdown’s dictionary corner, was asked to reveal her favourite word.

Podcast host Jamie Laing acknowledged that this would be a “tricky” question for the etymological expert - but Susie was characteristically unfazed.

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“I’ve got loads, and they sort of change every day,” she said.

“I love local dialects, so from Yorkshire there’s this old term ‘crambazzled’ and to be ‘crambazzled’ is to be prematurely aged from excess partying, which I just think is brilliant”.

Jamie’s co-host Spencer Matthews was quick to jump on the Yorkshire term, replying: “Oh my God, Jamie is crambazzled!”

“I’ve never heard of a better word to describe my co-host”.

This was not Susie's first public mention of 'crambazzled', as the TV star has tweeted of her fondness for the word a number of times.

On the podcast, Susie then pulled out another archaic alcohol-related term - ‘grog-blossom’.

“A grog-blossom is when you get those veiny things going on on your nose, just a slightly ruddy complexion, again from too much drinking, from too much grog,” she explained.

The Countdown legend then named another of her favourite words as “mumpsimus,” which is someone who insists they’re right despite clear evidence that they’re not.

“That’s my wife’s entire family!” replied Spencer. “Jamie is crambazzled, my wife is a mumpsimus.”

“And you’re a narcissist,” Jamie retorted.

The ‘6 degrees from Jamie and Spencer’ episode featuring Susie Dent was published on BBC Sounds on September 9.

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